Monday, March 16, 2009

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation No real protection here in NL....And More

14 Mar 2009

The St. John's Telegram

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation
No real protection here

by Judie Squires Portugal Cove

While other provinces in Canada are making great strides towards
protecting human health and the environment, Newfoundland neglects to
enforce rudimentary pesticide regulations.

Quebec has proved to be a leader in protecting human health and the
environment by being the first province to initiate a province-wide
pesticide ban. Other provinces are now following suit. Over 15 million
Canadians are currently protected from pesticides and many more are
expected to be protected in the coming year.

In the news across Canada, this week great applause has been given to
the province of Ontario for its progressive decision to implement a
province-wide ban on the sale and use of non-essential synthetic
pesticides. Along with Ontario, Prince Edward Island is drafting a
provincial ban.

Others planning, too

New Brunswick, as well as other provinces, is considering a ban, given
the medical evidence of the harmful effects of synthetic pesticides.

While most Canadian provinces are moving ahead, Newfoundland once
again lags behind.

Not only does there seem to be little discussion of a provincial
pesticide bylaw, it appears our province won’t even take the current
regulations seriously.

Just a few years ago, our Department of Environment and Conservation
ditched an essential pesticide regulation without public consultation.
Rather than enforcing the regulations, they bent to industry pressure
and reduced neighbour notification laws.

While other provinces are protecting public health, our province
continues to offer little to no public protection by catering to lawn
care companies at the cost of Newfoundlanders’ health.

Weakened legislation

In 2007, our government decided, on the basis of industry
recommendation, to change its regulations and lessen the amount of
public protection from 50 meters to 15 meters and leave notification
“up to the discretion of the operator.”

Aside from weak regulations, our province provides only two full-time
control personnel to monitor all of Newfoundland and Labrador’s
pesticide use.

When violations do occur, these officers seem to have little ability
to do anything more than give warnings.

I have submitted and photographed violations too numerous to mention,
violations that affect the health of citizens, water, wildlife and
even the pesticide applicators themselves.

I have yet to see even one industry reprimand.

Health-care concern
http://groups.google.ca/group/bylawswork/post?hl=en
With the state of our health-care system, shouldn’t our province be
doing everything it can to promote illness prevention?

Why are we still allowing our province to be contaminated with
millions of litres of pesticides haphazardly sprayed into our
environment and the air we breathe every season?

The season of spraying is just around the corner.

Act now

I am asking every Newfoundlander and Labradorian who cares about their
health, their pets, their environment and their wildlife to please
take the time to write or call to the minister of Heath and Community
Services or contact your MHA, and ask them to step forward and protect
the health of our citizens from pesticides.

Please join me in lobbying our province for a pesticide ban, if you
need more information feel free to visit my website: www.freewebs.com/sprayadvisory

http://www.pressdisplay.com/pressdisplay/viewer.aspx#

==============================
=

March 16, 2009

Miramichi Leader,

It worked in P.E.I.

Bet it works here too.

The final push is on to convince the provincial government to ban
pesticides used to keep lawns green and weed free.

And one of the weapons being used by ban fans is science.

Perfect.

There's a pattern to how you influence public policy.

Politicians and business people learned it long ago. It's why U.S.
President George W. Bush hooked a ride on a fighter and landed on the
aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in 2003.

It made him look like Tom Cruise in the movie "Top Gun". Well, maybe,
just a little, little bit. If you squint really hard.

Bush flew to the carrier just off the coast of San Diego to claim the
U.S. had accomplished its mission in Iraq. Oops. Bit premature. Bush
is gone, but the Iraq war goes on.

Manipulating the press and public that way works, however. Bush got on
TV, with lots of soldiers cheering his every word. Mission
accomplished.

It's why Prime Minister Stephen Harper wore the blue sweater during
the last election. It's less formal. More friendly. See, I'm one of
the guys, just like you. Really.

Well, grassroots groups can play the same game. And now they do.

Just last month ban fans earned headlines when they released an
opinion poll on what they call ‘cosmetic' pesticides. Back to that
phrase in a moment.

"A poll commissioned by the Canadian Cancer Society, the Lung
Association of New Brunswick and the Canadian Association of
Physicians for the Environment suggests 79 per cent of people in the
province would support a ban on those chemicals used to improve the
look of lawns and gardens," the CBC reported. "The results…were
similar to those found in a government report released in December."

The story quoted Gideon Forman, executive director of the Canadian
Association of Physicians for the Environment, as saying the Ipsos
Reid poll done in December found 72 per cent of the New Brunswickers
surveyed don't use pesticides.

"And then they asked people who do use pesticides, ‘Would you be
willing to switch if we showed you how to?'... most of those say yes
they would," he said.

And the poll found of the 438 people surveyed, 47 per cent completely
support a ban, 32 per cent mostly support one.

This has a very familiar ring to it.

In January of last year, the Canadian Cancer Society in Prince Edward
Island did the same thing. It released a poll looking at public
support for a ban.

"The poll, conducted by Corporate Research Associates Inc. in November
2007, surveyed 1,101 households in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island
and Nova Scotia. Of those surveyed, 69 per cent support a ban on the
use of cosmetic pesticides, and 79 per cent believe pesticides used
for lawn and garden maintenance have the potential to pose a health
risk to people," the society said.

The eloquent Cancer Society's executive director for P.E.I. did
interviews talking about the survey. There were headlines. It was
perfect.

Perfect because the ban fans had learned the lessons of spin and
applied them without a hitch.

• You need a cause people will support. Well, if pesticides can kill
fish and fowl, they must be bad. Agent Orange, used to strip the
leaves from trees during the Vietnam War, caused cancer. Ditto DDT.

• You need a good spokesperson from a credible group. Got it covered.
Go ahead, pick on the Canadian Cancer Society, the Lung Association of
New Brunswick and the Canadian Association of Physicians for the
Environment. I dare you.

• And you need numbers, because numbers mean science. And science is
tough to argue with, I mean, it has numbers on its side and they're so…
mysterious.

The result in P.E.I.?

"The P.E.I. government intends to ban the sale of cosmetic pesticides
starting in 2010," the CBC said last Monday. "Environment Minister
Richard Brown told CBC News…that regulations are being drawn up and
they will be straightforward."

"A ban is a ban. Those products will not be allowed to be sold on
P.E.I.," he said.

And the icing on the cake?

When the P.E.I. legislature's standing committee on agriculture,
forestry and environment issued its report supporting a ban issued its
report, it said in part: "Research has shown that a ban on the use of
cosmetic pesticides is most effective if it includes a ban on the sale
of those pesticides."

‘Cosmetic' pesticides.

Name the issue and you define the debate.

‘Cosmetic pesticide' sounds so vain. And protecting our planet from
needless poisons is so serious. We must do something. Now.

New Brunswick is expected to announce its decision this spring.

Mission accomplished.

Author and former editor of the Miramichi Leader, Rick MacLean teaches
journalism at Holland College in Prince Edward Island.

http://miramichileader.canadaeast.com/search/article/604087

===============================

Monday March 16th, 2009

The Fredericton Daily Gleaner

Legislature opens Tuesday with budget unveiling

By STEPHEN LLEWELLYN
llewellyn.stephen@dailygleaner.com

The provincial government will introduce between 40-50 pieces of
legislation during the spring session that starts Tuesday, says
Government House Leader and Health Minister Mike Murphy.

He declined to be specific about what legislation will be introduced,
except there will be a bill on the protection of electronic health
information.

The government is supposed to introduce electronic health records by
the end of this year.

"You can't turn on the switch until you have the legislation in place
to protect New Brunswickers' health information," said Murphy.

He said the government is working on new rules for home pesticide use
but couldn't promise there would be legislation this spring.

There could also be an adjustment to the role of nurse practitioners
this spring, he said.

Murphy said he's making progress on the idea of private health
clinics.

"Hopefully I will be able to put that tool in the tool box this
spring," he said.

The session will start with the new provincial budget Tuesday.

"These are extraordinary fiscal times with a deficit that will be
very, very significant, but (it's) something that, very unfortunately
for the interim period in this country, is going to be the norm," he
said.

The federal government and many of the provinces are running deficits,
and thousands of Canadians have lost their jobs as the national
unemployment rate reached 7.7 per cent, said Murphy.

"New Brunswick is not immune to that," he said.

He said Tuesday's budget will keep promises in the Liberals' campaign
platform, Charter for Change, and provide tax relief.

"Not only are we looking at weathering the storm, but (we're) in fact
continuing our plan to attract New Brunswickers," said Murphy.

He said the budget will be the only item of business Tuesday and the
budget debate will wrap up with the closing speech by Premier Shawn
Graham around March 27.

"Last fall we had a significantly elevated level of debate from both
sides," said Murphy. "I hope that continues and ... we are both able
to ... debate ideas and certainly not bicker over politics and
personalities."

He said the Opposition can't support its federal cousins in Ottawa
with a $38-billion deficit and stimulus package and still criticize
the Liberals here for doing the same thing.

"They have to talk about ideas," said Murphy. "We intend on holding
them to the substance of debate."

Official Opposition Leader David Alward said he and his caucus are
looking forward to returning to the legislature.

"Our caucus is prepared," he said. "We are focused. We will stay
focused on issues and not on people."

He said the Opposition will concentrate on three pillars of criticism:
fiscal management, the province's people and resources, and the values
all New Brunswickers share.

"We have grave concerns about ... the $800-million deficit," he said.
"The very fast growth in the provincial net debt will have an impact
on future generations, our children and grandchildren. We are further
away from self-sufficiency than ever before."

Nova Scotia is projecting a balanced budget, said Alward.

"Clearly the legacy of the Shawn Graham government will be a legacy of
incompetence," he said.

"They have shown they are not capable of managing our resources in the
good times."

http://dailygleaner.canadaeast.com/cityregion/article/604315

===============================

March 14, 2009

The Pembroke Daily Observer

Objects to term "special interest groups"

Editor:

Re Municipal exemptions, an article by Stephen Uhler, published in The
Daily Observer on March 11, 2009. Indeed, the provincial ban allows
for some municipal exemptions in the urban application of pesticides.

"The exception, which is detailed in the pesticides act, states the
chemicals can be used to maintain safe conditions, and the security of
and emergency access to public works, which includes highways,
railways, power works, gas works, water works and other utilities,
transit/ transportation corridors and the perimeter of nuclear
facilities."

So far all this sounds businesslike, but I strongly object to the use
of the offensive phrase "special interest groups", meaning
troublemakers, with reference to those who are knowledgeable on this
issue and are concerned about potential health effects of pesticides.

The phrase "special interest groups" better applies to the self-
interested spokesmen for the chemical lawn application industry.

Bonnechere Valley Township Mayor Zig Mintha claims this whole issue
has resulted from not distinguishing between "safe" and "unsafe"
pesticides. There are no "safe pesticides". "Cide" means kill. All
pesticides kill and are thus unsafe. However, some are especially
toxic.

K. Jean Cottam Nepean, Ont.

http://www.thedailyobserver.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1478682

===============================

Ontario Bans Pesticides For Earth Day 2009
Sunday, 15 March 2009 GreenMuze Staff

The province of Ontario, Canada has established a ban on cosmetic
pesticides that will take effect on April 22, 2009 – Earth Day.
Ontario residents will no longer be able to apply pesticides to lawns,
gardens, parks or schoolyards.

The province-wide ban covers a wide variety of herbicides, fungicides
and insecticides that will no longer be available for cosmetic use.
More than 250 products will be banned for sale and an estimated 80
pesticide ingredients will be banned for cosmetic uses in Ontario.

Ontario is the second province to ban cosmetic pesticide use in
Canada. Quebec enacted a similar ban in 2006. Ontario’s new
regulations surpass existing restrictions placed on pesticide use in
Quebec.

Ontario’s cosmetic pesticide ban will still allow for the continued
use of pesticides for public health or safety reasons, such as
fighting West Nile Virus, killing stinging insects like wasps, or
controlling poison ivy and other plants poisonous to the touch. Other
exceptions to the pesticide ban include agriculture and forestry. Golf
courses are exempt from the ban and can continue to use pesticides for
cosmetic use.

The David Suzuki Foundation, one of the driving forces behind
pesticide awareness campaigns in Canada, hopes other provinces will
follow Ontario’s lead and “…meet or beat Ontario’s ban on cosmetic
pesticides to ensure a high standard of protection for human health
and the environment across the country”.
Resources

Read about the Cosmetic Pesticide Ban in Ontario:
http://www.ene.gov.on.ca/en/land/pesticides/index.php
The David Suzuki Foundation: http://www.davidsuzuki.org/

http://www.greenmuze.com/action/pesticides/911-ontario-bans-pesticides-for-earth-day.html

===============================

Home » 60 Minutes
Alice Waters' Crusade For Better Food
Lesley Stahl Profiles The Outspoken, And Sometimes Controversial
California Food Activist

Comments Comments 33 | Page 1 of 4

March 15, 2009
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Alice Waters (CBS)

Play Video
PlayVideo
The Mother Of Slow Food

Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh food
for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef and
restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps us
healthier and greener. | Share/Embed

* Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh
food for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef
and restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps
us healthier and greener.
The Mother Of Slow Food (12:31)
* Legendary cook and natural food enthusiast Alice Waters creates
a breakfast treat for Lesley Stahl.
Alice's Restaurant (2:08)
* When you`re Alice Waters` daughter, lunch is always an
adventure!
Exclusive: Home Cooking (2:04)

» More Videos
Related
Fact Or Fiction?
Food For Thought

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Stories

* For The Love Of Local Food


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(CBS) When it comes to food, Alice Waters is a legend. At age 64, she
has done more to change how we Americans eat, cook and think about
food than anyone since Julia Child.

Waters was only 27 years old in 1971 when she opened her French bistro
Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., today considered one of the finest
restaurants not just in the United States but in the world.

Waters has produced eight cookbooks, but she's more famous as the
mother of a movement that preaches about fresh food grown in a way
that's good for the environment. The movement, now called "slow food,"
is a healthy alternative to "fast food."

You might think this appeals only to the Prius-driving, latte-sipping
upper crust, but Waters' ideas have gone mainstream.


It all started at Waters' culinary temple, Chez Panisse. She still
shows up almost every day, as she has for the last 37 years, to
oversee the cooking with her exquisite, infallible taste buds.

It's not just the cooking that has made her famous: it's the
ingredients. She was one of the first to serve antibiotic and hormone
free meats and insist on fresh, organic, locally-grown fruits and
vegetables.

"You started a revolution in food. How we think about food. How we
cook food. But do you think of yourself as a revolutionary?"
correspondent Lesley Stahl asked Waters.

"I guess I do now, but when I started Chez Panisse I wasn't thinking
of a philosophy about organic and sustainable. I just was looking for
flavor," Waters replied.

It's flavor that comes from serving only seasonal food, one of her
hallmarks; say "frozen" and Alice Waters shudders. Because all her
food has to be fresh, she buys only from local ranchers, fishermen and
farmers.

People who meet Waters are struck by how gentle and dreamy she seems
to be, and they wonder how someone like that became so successful.
Truth is, Alice Waters is a steamroller, relentlessly going after what
she wants. And now she wants everyone to cook the way she does. And
that has put her in the spotlight

"People have become aware that way that we've been eating is making us
sick," she said.

She has become the leader of a movement to change how we eat. And
she's getting traction. Now you can go to your neighborhood grocery
store - even Wal-Mart - and buy organic. But in the process, she's
become a target.

"People say Alice Waters is self-righteous and elitist. And these are
words I've heard over and over," Stahl pointed out.

"I feel that good food should be a right and not a privilege and it
needs to be without pesticides and herbicides. And everybody deserves
this food. And that's not elitist," Waters argued.

Search • Tips

Home » 60 Minutes
Alice Waters' Crusade For Better Food
Lesley Stahl Profiles The Outspoken, And Sometimes Controversial
California Food Activist

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March 15, 2009
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Alice Waters (CBS)

Play Video
PlayVideo
The Mother Of Slow Food

Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh food
for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef and
restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps us
healthier and greener. | Share/Embed

* Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh
food for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef
and restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps
us healthier and greener.
The Mother Of Slow Food (12:31)
* Legendary cook and natural food enthusiast Alice Waters creates
a breakfast treat for Lesley Stahl.
Alice's Restaurant (2:08)
* When you`re Alice Waters` daughter, lunch is always an
adventure!
Exclusive: Home Cooking (2:04)

» More Videos
Related
Fact Or Fiction?
Food For Thought

Fact Or Fiction?

How much do you really know about nutrition? Take our quiz!


Stories

* For The Love Of Local Food


Answers.com

(CBS) Even as a little girl, Waters says she had a keen sense of
taste. But what turned her into a cook was going to France in 1965 and
eating simple and healthy country food. She had her epiphany.

Back at Berkeley, she was a hippie involved in movements: anti-war,
free speech, women's rights. But what she really loved was cooking,
and feeding her friends. And she still does.

One day last August, she took 60 Minutes to a Mexican food stall in
San Francisco where friends of hers were making slow food to go with
organic corn and lots of spices.

You realize two things when you travel around with Alice Waters: one
is that deep down she loves it when people eat, and two, it is that
you can't resist her.

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, a Waters disciple, told Stahl, "She
has, I think, done more to change our eating habits for the better
than anyone in the United States of America."

He agreed that obesity is a huge issue now. "We consume lousy food.
This is killing us. I mean it really is. We have a drinking and eating
problem in this country, not just in San Francisco. And this whole
movement to me is the antidote for that."

Waters talked Newsom into letting her organize a "slow food" festival
outside City Hall last September. Growing the slow food movement is
one of her passions: she was ecstatic that 85,000 people showed up.

She walked Stahl through the taste pavilions, introducing her to her
acolytes: organic cheese merchants and bakers.

The centerpiece of the event was a sprawling, urban victory garden - a
real vegetable garden in front of City Hall. Waters called it "the
ultimate symbolism."

The garden, Waters' idea, was planted to encourage people to grow
their own.

She brought Stahl over to one of her favorite local farmers, John
Lagier, who uses only eco-friendly, or as Waters would say,
"sustainable" methods. That day he was showing off his specialty
grapes, Bronx seedless, which he was selling at $4 a pound.

There's the rub. A common complaint about organic food is that it's
expensive.

"We make decisions everyday about what we're going to eat," Waters
said. "And some people want to buy Nike shoes - two pairs, and other
people want to eat Bronx grapes, and nourish themselves. I pay a
little extra, but this is what I want to do."

60 Minutes
Alice Waters' Crusade For Better Food
Lesley Stahl Profiles The Outspoken, And Sometimes Controversial
California Food Activist

Comments Comments 34 | Page 3 of 4

March 15, 2009
Send this story via emailE-Mail Story

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Share

Text Size: A A A

* Videos
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Alice Waters (CBS)

Play Video
PlayVideo
The Mother Of Slow Food

Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh food
for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef and
restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps us
healthier and greener. | Share/Embed

* Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh
food for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef
and restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps
us healthier and greener.
The Mother Of Slow Food (12:31)
* Legendary cook and natural food enthusiast Alice Waters creates
a breakfast treat for Lesley Stahl.
Alice's Restaurant (2:08)
* When you`re Alice Waters` daughter, lunch is always an
adventure!
Exclusive: Home Cooking (2:04)

» More Videos
Related
Fact Or Fiction?
Food For Thought

Fact Or Fiction?

How much do you really know about nutrition? Take our quiz!


Stories

* For The Love Of Local Food


Answers.com

(CBS) To prove to Stahl that healthy, slow food is worth the money,
and can be fast and easy, she invited her to her house for breakfast.

She was going to cook some eggs and make a salad with tomatoes. It was
at the house that Stahl realized that Waters lives in a different
world - for one, she doesn't have a microwave.

Asked how she lives without one, Waters replied, "I don’t know how you
can sort of live with one."

But how many stressed out working mothers have this kind of patience
in the morning? She chopped up chives, diced up tomatoes, and
marinated them in olive oil and garlic.

Waters told Stahl she rarely goes into a regular supermarket. "I'm
looking for food that's just been picked. And so, I know when I go the
farmer's market that you know, they just brought it in that day."

"I have to say, it's just a luxury to be able to do that," Stahl
remarked.

"In a sense it is a luxury," Waters agreed.

A luxury that's delectable: once she spread the ripe tomatoes and
Tuscan olive oil on a slab of organic bread, she started on the eggs.

Her cooking "equipment" includes a fireplace in her kitchen.

Not sure if it was the roaring fire in the kitchen or the "fast and
easy" part - is she kidding? But Stahl said it was one of the best
breakfasts of her life.

Waters is already trying to influence the next generation by creating
another garden, something she calls "The Edible Schoolyard."

"This is an effort to bring kids into a new relationship to food," she
explained.

Waters got a local middle school in Berkeley to create a course where
kids learn about growing food right on the school grounds.

The students told Stahl they were planting strawberries and
cultivating the bed; one kid says it was the most fun class he had.

They also thought they were learning something important. "We're
learning about compost, crab grass, how to raise [a] good healthy
garden," one boy told Stahl.

"You know it's kind of a thrill every time I come here. I think I just
want to get my hands in the soil," Waters told Stahl. "I want to go
down on my hands and knees and be a child again."



Home » 60 Minutes
Alice Waters' Crusade For Better Food
Lesley Stahl Profiles The Outspoken, And Sometimes Controversial
California Food Activist

Comments Comments 34 | Page 4 of 4

March 15, 2009
Send this story via emailE-Mail Story

Print this storyPrint Story

Read related blogs & articles about this storySphere

Share

Text Size: A A A

* Videos
* Photos

Alice Waters (CBS)

Play Video
PlayVideo
The Mother Of Slow Food

Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh food
for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef and
restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps us
healthier and greener. | Share/Embed

* Alice Waters has been preaching the virtues of cultivating fresh
food for decades. As Lesley Stahl reports, this world-renowned chef
and restaurateur hopes a slower approach to the food we eat will keeps
us healthier and greener.
The Mother Of Slow Food (12:31)
* Legendary cook and natural food enthusiast Alice Waters creates
a breakfast treat for Lesley Stahl.
Alice's Restaurant (2:08)
* When you`re Alice Waters` daughter, lunch is always an
adventure!
Exclusive: Home Cooking (2:04)

» More Videos
Related
Fact Or Fiction?
Food For Thought

Fact Or Fiction?

How much do you really know about nutrition? Take our quiz!


Stories

* For The Love Of Local Food


Answers.com

(CBS) The garden is just half of the program. The kids also learn how
to cook what they’ve grown. For many of the kids it's the first time
they've cooked and eaten fresh, organic food.

"Did you ever cook anything that you thought before, oh my god, I’d
never eat anything…like that in a million [years]?" Stahl asked the
children.

"Oh yeah. This one thing with toast and then there's spinach and
mushrooms on top of it. I thought I would hate it but it was really
good," one student told Stahl.

If Waters had her way, there'd be a program like this in every single
school.

"We have schools across the country that are cutting gym, where they
can't afford books for the kids. Do you think it's possible that what
you're doing or what you're trying to do can really be spread all
across the country in these times?" Stahl asked.

"In these times it needs to be spread more than ever," Waters argued.
"That children would grow up knowing how to cook. This is something
that we don't know how to do anymore."

"But can we afford it? I guess that's what I'm asking," Stahl said.

"But we can't not afford it," Waters argued.

She did agree with the notion that she's a dreamer.

But to others she's a visionary. Now she has her sights on a new
project and we would like to warn President Obama that the steamroller
is on its way.

"You have been pushing for a vegetable garden at the White House for
years. Rose garden? Forget that. You want a broccoli garden?" Stahl
asked.

"I have been talking nonstop about the symbolism of an edible
landscape at the White House. I think it says everything about
stewardship of the land and about the nourishment of a nation," Waters
said.

Asked if she thinks she'll achieve such a garden at the White House,
Waters told Stahl, "Well, I'm very hopeful. I've always liked the idea
of doing press conferences at the compost heap."

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/03/13/60minutes/main4863738.shtml

===============================

US ignoring responsibility for plight of Agent Orange victims

(16-03-2009)

The vice president and general secretary of the Viet Nam Association
for Victims of Agent Orange/dioxin, Tran Xuan Thu, spoke to Viet Nam
News about the US Supreme Court decision to refuse the victims’
appeal.

The US Supreme Court on March 2 refused to hear the appeal of
Vietnamese Agent Orange victims in their suit against 37 American
chemical companies that produced and supplied the substance to the US
military during the war in Viet Nam. What do you think about this
decision?

Their decision was completely groundless. It denies the facts about
the consequences of Agent Orange and dioxin in Viet Nam that had been
confirmed by many Vietnamese and international scientists.

It is absolutely unreasonable to conclude that the chemicals they used
during the war were purely herbicides and not poisonous. This totally
contradicts the obvious consequences not only to US and Vietnamese
veterans but also veterans from South Korea, Australia and New
Zealand, who also participated in the American war in Viet Nam. More
importantly, the grave effects of Agent Orange have been confirmed by
numerous research projects carried out by prestigious scientists and
laboratories around the world, including the US National Academy of
Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences, Germany’s ERGO Laboratory
and Japan’s Matsuda Laboratory.

The US side in this case has stated that the chemicals used in the war
in Viet Nam were not purposefully aimed at humans. This point is
meritless, as the US military sprayed dioxins directly over 3,000
villages in Viet Nam, which were the residences of millions of people,
and thousands of villages were critically affected by this poisonous
chemical. Some 3 million Vietnamese have suffered the consequences
caused by Agent Orange and dioxin.

Last but not least, this groundless decision does not comform with the
developing relationship between Viet Nam and the US. VAVA will surely
keep persevering with the struggle of Agent Orange victims until
justice is achieved.

What’s the next step?

The dismissal of the US Supreme Court of the Vietnamese Agent Orange
victims’ petition only applies in states within the jurisdiction of
the US Court of Appeals’ Second Circuit. Under US law, we can still
file the suit in a federal court in one of the remaining circuits. It
will take time and a large amount of money to pursue the action. But
the biggest difficulty is that the American side always cops out of
their responsibilities in resolving the aftermath of Agent Orange in
Viet Nam.

However, we still hope that justice will be achieved as we have
received support not only domestically but also from international
friends of the victims, including the US’s Viet Nam Agent Orange
Relief and Responsibility, Britain’s Viet Nam Friendship Society, and
the France – Viet Nam Friendship Association. For instance, the
secretary of UK-Viet Nam Friendship Society, Len Aldis, sent a second
letter to the US President affirming that the struggle would continue
until justice was won for Vietnamese Agent Orange victims and asking
the American side to acknowledge its responsibility to all the
victims.

What has VAVA done to support Agent Orange victims?

The Government has concentrated on long-term research to help victims
overcome the consequences. VAVA has already co-ordinated with
scientific offices to determine ways to lessen the aftermath of Agent
Orange for the victims, as well as to guide residents in severely
contaminated areas to minimise exposure. People suffering from dioxin
exposure in these areas have received recommendations from the health
services.

Financially, in addition to the Government support to the victims
amounting to VND800 billion (US$47-million) per year, VAVA has
collected about VND86 billion over the past five years from domestic
and international individuals and charity organisations. We have spent
the money helping victims build houses and supporting the education of
younger victims.

VAVA would like to appeal to all Vietnamese and to people all over the
world of good conscience to keep supporting and standing by Viet Nam
in demanding the US to take legal and moral responsibility for the
consequences of Agent Orange and dioxin in Viet Nam. — VNS

http://vietnamnews.vnagency.com.vn/showarticle.php?num=02COM16030

===============================

EU completes 16-year pesticide review
Published: Monday 16 March 2009

Detailed human health and environmental risk assessment of some 1,000
active substances authorised for use in pesticides before 1991 has led
to the removal of more than two thirds of them from the market.

The risk assessment review evaluated each substance with respect to
the health of consumers, farmers, groundwater and non-target
organisms, such as birds, mammals, earthworms and bees.

According to the European Commission, there were around 1,000 active
substances contained in tens of thousands of products on the market
when the review was launched in 1993.

The review has led "to the removal from the market of more than two
thirds of these substances," said Health Commissioner Androulla
Vassiliou, presenting the final results last week.

The majority of substances, about 67%, were eliminated because
"dossiers were either not submitted, were incomplete or were withdrawn
by the industry," the Commission said. Some 70 substances were
withdrawn from the market because the evaluation revealed risks to
human health and the environment.

Another 250 substances (26%) passed the harmonised EU safety
assessment. A databaseexternal of the approved active substances is
being launched today (16 March 2009).

Late last year, the European Parliament and the Council reached
agreement on new market authorisation rules for pesticides proposed by
the Commission in July 2006 (EurActiv 19/12/08). The regulation, set
to enter into force later in 2009, replaces the 1991 DirectivePdf
external on market authorisation of pesticides, under which the
sixteen-year review was conducted, and thus restarts the assessment
process for substances that are currently authorised.

The new regulation tightens the environmental and health criteria for
approval, introduces a ban on certain toxic chemicals and establishes
the principle of compulsory mutual recognition of market authorisation
inside three geographical zones (north, centre and south) of the EU.
Links
European Union

* European Commission: Commission completes pesticide review
programme – an important step to ensure the protection of health and
environmentexternal (12 March 2009)
* European Commission: Database on active substancesexternal
* European Commission: Plant Protection - Evaluation &
Authorisationexternal
* European Food Safety Agency (EFSA): Pesticide Risk Assessment
Peer Review Unit (PRAPeR)

===============================
Warning Industry Propaganda Below
===============================

Rittenhouse / March'09 - City Gardening

March 2009

City Gardening by Wes Porter

Proposed Pesticide Ban Presents Problems

The Cosmetic Pesticide Ban is making its way through the Ontario
provincial legislature. Normally such would proceed with all the speed
of cold molasses. Here, politicians and their bureaucratic accessories
are moving with all the enthusiasm of dung beetles heading for an open
sewer.

The matter has caught the attention and apparently the support of the
province’s hoi polloi. But why the speed and desire for enactment from
McGuinty’s government? This was, after all, the selfsame government
that spent months dithering while 50,000 university students were
denied their education by a strike.

Weird and wonderous are the ways of governments and green enthusiasts,
however. The pesticides that are to be banned from home gardening
attempts to raise vegetables and fruit are deemed perfectly safe to be
applied on farm and forest.

And while the legislation is labelled as a cosmetic ban it will not
prevent golf courses from applying same pesticides claimed hazardous
to use on lawns and gardens.

Insecticides that are verboten to qualified specialist use by the
garden maintenance industry are to be approved for wafting over the
urban landscape by untrained householders. It would have done Lucrezia
Borgia proud.

In a fit of draconian devilment, the gnomes of Queen’s Park have
decreed there will be no phase-in period for the new regulations. The
moment they become promulgated, they will be the law of the land. What
happens to investments already made for the coming season by
businesses, or contracts previously signed, worries not Ontario’s
elected representatives or their minions. Strangely, previously under
similar circumstances such phase-in periods have been the norm.

“The regulations are aggressive, extreme, unfair, insensitive and
illogical,” says Tony DiGiovanni, Executive Director of the trade
group Landscape Ontario (LO).

But not everyone has viewed the new regime as such. In fact, there are
outright advantages to banning the dreaded chemicals some claim. The
city of Halifax was the first major metropolitan area to ban
pesticides. As a consequence, according to a report late last year in
the Toronto Sun, employment by lawn and garden maintenance operators
was said to have risen by 25 per cent.

Elsewhere, even prior to legislation being proposed, some in the
lawncare industry were already offering their clients the option of a
pesticide-free program. Phil Bull reports in Revolution Review, a
newsletter for professionals (www.turfrevolution.com), that this has
been a great success for such businesses – even in municipalities that
have yet to legislate a pesticide ban. Change is inevitable in any
industry, writes Bull. Without change an industry stagnates and begins
to diminish, he says. Don’t believe him? Then he suggests keep buying
GM stock – apparently it’s a real bargain these days.

Many others in the lawncare industry have campaigned for better,
professional use of pesticides. According to DiGiovanni, there are
approximately 1,300 companies that currently hold operator’s licenses
in Ontario. They employ approximately 15,000 licensed exterminators.
There are 5,000 pesticide technicians. These could and should be
permitted to use low-risk products to control infestations for which
no other solution is possible.

Wrote Dennis Avery of the Hudson Institute, Virginia: “After forty
years and billions of dollars in research, scientists are still
looking for the first victim of pesticide residues.”

More recently, Thomas Fuller pointed out in The New York Times: “The
mosquito responsible for the transmission of malaria is still endemic
in the United States. But modern housing, better access to health care
and the use of insecticides have virtually eradicated the disease in
wealthier countries.” Nevertheless, the polls are persuasive when it
comes politicians’ decisions.

Queen’s Park, seat of the Ontario government, is built on a formerly
marshy, mosquito-infested tract. In colonial Upper Canada they
suffered from the ‘ague.’ One can only wonder what the response would
be if provincial politicians and their bureaucrat employees became
thus infected. Would they continue to be so eager to ban effective
control of the vector?

More: details of the Cosmetic Pesticide Ban may be seen at www.ebr.gov.on.ca
registry number 010-5080

http://www.rittenhouse.ca/asp/AboutUs.asp?LID=2342

===============================

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and error free. However, we're not perfect all of the time.

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There are two ways to contact Rittenhouse : by email to the webmaster
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St. John's Daily Spray Advisory

My Past Articles

More enforcement needed for pesticide spray regulations
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 413 words
Karen Griffin - Judie Squires says someone needs to patrol the companies that spray residential areas for pesticides because she's observed nine violations of the Environmental Protection Act in her Paradise neighborhood alone


Spray woes: Province falling down on monitoring pesticides
The Telegram (St. John's) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 253 words
Judie Squires - environment to become poisoned? A temporary ban on all residential pesticides has to be put into place, to protect us, our wildlife and our environment as a whole. Judie Squires Paradise


Government lax on cosmetic pesticide regulation: advocate
The Telegram (St. John's) - 08-28-2004 - 613 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic the province will ban cosmetic use


Woman doesn't expect cosmetic pesticide ban any time soon
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - 08-30-2004 - 712 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic that the province will ban the


Province lagging behind in pesticide control
The Telegram (St. John's) - 09-04-2005 - 496 words
Squires, Judie - it to do is to prohibit the cosmetic use of synthetic pesticides altogether in order to protect our citizens and the environment. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


The two sides to pesticide use
The Telegram (St. John's) - 07-16-2006 - 781 words
Judie Squires - health of your families. When Canada's most respected health authorities tell us pesticides threaten our health, we should all be listening. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


Inquiry implicates BTk
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 353 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - of trees. The live spores can be inhaled by humans and animals exposed to BT. Judie Squires, secretary of the Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, says despite claims that


Delayed pesticide laws 'disappointing'
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 833 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - at the end of this year. These products will only be sold to certified dealers. Judie Squires, secretary of the newly formed Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, isn't


Above Articles available through Trancontinental Newsnet

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation
The Telegram (St. John's) - 03-14-2009 - 419 words
pesticides. Please join me in lobbying our province for a pesticide ban Judie Squires Portugal Cove...

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