Sunday, February 27, 2011

Toxic Tears: A tale of many Punjab villages - The Times of India

Toxic Tears: A tale of many Punjab villages - The Times of India Best Blogger Tips
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Time to restrict pesticide use

26 Feb 2011

 The Telegram (St. John’s)

Time to restrict pesticide use

I am a member of the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides — Newfoundland and Labrador and want to thank everyone who attended our public forum last week as well as our excellent speakers. I also write in response to Lorne Hepworth’s letter to the editor “Pesticides have a role,” Feb. 12.

Mr. Hepworth seems to believe all pesticides are created equal and Health Canada is the best authority when it comes to determining if a product is safe. Pesticides have different uses, and the necessity of food production is about as far removed from esthetic application as you can get.

Some pesticides are used in agriculture to eliminate insect pests. Others are herbicides designed to destroy dandelions in suburban lawns and create the illusion of healthy, uniform grass. All pesticides are designed to kill unwanted organisms. Some are necessary and some are not.

As more and more provinces ban lawn pesticides, Health Canada seems rather ineffective. If the majority of citizens ask for greater health protection, shouldn’t our government grant it to us?

Five provincial governments and dozens of municipalities now believe we should treat pesticides as guilty until (conclusively) proven innocent. Eighty per cent of Canadians have already been protected by pesticide bans due to the same combination of public support and demonstrated danger that gave us smoke-free public spaces. It’s about time Newfoundland and Labrador joined its neighbours.

In contrast to tobacco, there are comparatively few epidemiological studies relating to chronic illness and pesticide use.

Many studies which are done on the health effects of pesticides are toxicological and produced by the chemical manufacturers themselves, which leads you to question their objectivity.

Smoking is a personal choice, but breathing air contaminated by pesticides in your neighbourhood is not. We do not allow smoking in public places or in cars containing children because people have no choice but to breathe second-hand smoke in their environment and we know this kills as well.

Isn’t it time we restricted unnecessary and harmful chemicals in our neighbourhoods?

If you are interested in showing your support for a ban on chemical pesticides, sign the petition available at http://www.gopetition. com/petition/42016.html

 Darcie Cohen
 St. John’s
      
    http://www.thetelegram.com Best Blogger Tips
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Friday, February 25, 2011

Government Must Take Cosmetic Pesticide Issue Seriously: NDP

Government Must Take Cosmetic Pesticide Issue Seriously: NDP

VOCM - ‎14 hours ago‎
New Democratic Party leader Lorraine Michael is disappointed that Environment Minister Ross Wiseman is taking his time to review the issue of cosmetic pesticide use in the province. Michael is asking Wiseman to decide in favour of groups who are ...

http://www.vocm.com
New Democratic Party leader Lorraine Michael
http://www.nl.ndp.ca/

Facebook - New Democratic Party leader Lorraine Michael
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lorraine-Michael/52777723313
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Thursday, February 24, 2011

This is the song that never ends....

Playing in my thoughts like the children's song...."This is the song that never ends...It just goes on and on my friends...." And on and on it goes.

Environment Ministers apprenticing to learn the roles and just as the tutelage reaches a eureka point it's on to another minister....Nothing gets done.  Issues are never addressed.  Time to educate another minister and another and another....

Kevin Aylward, Tom Osborne, Clyde Jackman, Paul Oram, Charlene Johnson, and now Ross Wiseman...

In July of 2002 groups of concerned citizens met with Kevin Aylward, Environment minister at that time, to discuss health and environmental concerns of cosmetic pesticide use and the growing number of communities in Canada prohibiting the use of toxic pesticides.

Minister Wiseman stated in a recent Telegram article "“There’s been a lot of discussion over the two or three years around the issue, so I think it’s something we need to respond to.”

Two to three years?

9 years have passed...9 years and 6 ministers.

When will this song ever end?

Time's a wasting...Will Ross Wiseman be the minister to tie an end to the exhausting infinite-loop of environmental ignorance?

We'll have to wait and see, but for now...It just goes on and on my friends... Best Blogger Tips
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Environment minister looking into call for ban on cosmetic pesticide

3 Feb 2011

The St. John’s Telegram ()
 
BY COLIN MACLEAN
cmaclean@thetelegram.com

Environment minister looking into call for ban on cosmetic pesticide

Newfoundlandand Labrador’s minister of environment and conservation says he needs time to absorb all the information on the rationale behind banning cosmetic pesticides.

Ross Wiseman took over the environmental portfolio a little more than a month ago and told The Telegram on Monday he is still studying all the files that have come with his new job.

However, he said he is aware of the concerns put forward by organizations within this province pushing for a ban on cosmetic pesticides.

“There’s been a number of files I’ve had a chance to review. This is one of them,” said Wiseman.

The Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides has been lobbying the province for several years, asking it to ban the sale and use of cosmetic pesticide.

During a recent public forum on the issue, organized by the coalition, members complained that requests to meet with the province on the issue have not achieved results. A few members of the public who attended the meeting also said they had written to the government asking for a ban. Those who received letters of response were told the issue was under study.

Wiseman said he has asked his staff to collect the necessary information on the issue for his personal study.

“ There’s some data being pulled together. The department has given some thought to the issue for some time now, and as part of that process obviously (has been) pulling together some of the current research on the topic. What I’ve asked for is a summary of the information that we have. There’s some new information I’d like to have in addition to the information we already have,” he said.

“Obviously when I get a chance then to review it, I’ll be in a position to make some decision and bring forward a recommendation to my cabinet colleagues.”

Wiseman did not say one way or another if the issue was a priority for his office.

“There’s been a lot of discussion over the two or three years around the issue, so I think it’s something we need to respond to,” he said. “In terms of where it would fit with respect to a priority of government, depending on when I get a chance to review the file, then I will be in a much better position to talk about how we move forward.” Best Blogger Tips
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Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Local doctor optimistic as new minister reviews pesticide issue

22 Feb 2011

The Corner Brook Western Star

Local doctor optimistic as new minister reviews pesticide issue

BY CORY HURLEY
STAR STAFF WRITER

CORNER BROOK Retired doctor Ian Simpson is optimistic the provincial government will move legislation prohibiting the use of pesticides.

Speaking to the former western Newfoundland physician Monday, one can easily sense the newfound outlook for a man who has been lobbying for nearly a decade for such a restriction. However, one could also wonder how that desire can still flourish despite little movement toward enacting laws which the majority of Canada has in place.

Simpson lives on his quaint property in the Humber Village, with his backyard gardens and nurtured greenery, recalls the first time he spoke publicly against the use of pesticides. Danny Williams was campaigning for a run at premier when he addressed the Great Humber Joint Council in Massey Drive. Tom Marshall was simply a candidate in the forthcoming election and Marshall was joined in attendance by former then-Liberal environment minister Bob Mercer.

“It got a sensible hearing,” he said of his presentation that day. “Like anything else, whatever will get political push gets attention.”

Unfortunately for Simpson and other members of the later formed Newfoundland and Labrador Coalition on Pesticides, it has not gotten the political push since. The doctor believes that may be changing.

Last week, prior to a forum the coalition held in St. John’s Thursday, Simpson said he received a letter from new Environment Minister Ross Wiseman stating he hoped to meet with the group to discuss the issue. It comes 18 months after the coalition requested the meeting, he said, but they are looking forward to it.

Under the leadership of former Environment Minister Charlene Johnson this meeting was cancelled, delayed or ignored — depending on whom you ask — but, Simpson does not necessarily see that as a reflection of the former minister.

“My suspicion is whoever the minister, up to this point, would have been much the same,” he said. “Certainly one could criticize them, we have been trying to get them to listen to what are fairly significant facts in the health field.”

Simpson believes it has reached a time where government is now “embarrassed” it has yet to act on such legislation.

“My guess is, yes, it may be because of pressure now,” he said. “About 80 per cent of Canadians in communities are protected by some form of legislation as to what can be used, when it can be used, and what can’t be used.”

He said he expects something to be in place this year.

“But, I am always the optimist,” he said. Meanwhile, Wiseman said this was not a case of him coming into a new department to champion this particular cause, but it was something he identified while familiarizing himself with the various issues. On the contrary, he said his personal views as a resident of the province and MHA of Trinity North must be secondary in his role as minister.

“As a minister you have a responsibility to, on behalf of the people of the province, to objectively look at issues and do the appropriate due diligence ... and understand the issue,” he said. “Based on that, not be blinded by a personal view you might hold or a bias you might have.”

He said it has been an ongoing issue — a public one at that — and he has requested his staff gather the necessary information to prepare him to eventually make a recommendation to cabinet.

While acknowledging there has been a lot of public discussion on the issue, including presentations from a number of organizations requesting government review it, the minister would not put timeframes on his meeting with the coalition or making such recommendations to cabinet.

churley@thewesternstar.com

http://www.thewesternstar.com/ Best Blogger Tips
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Monday, February 21, 2011

2009 Poll reveals support for cosmetic pesticide ban in NL

Poll reveals support for cosmetic pesticide ban

The following joint news release has been issued on behalf of the Newfoundland and Labrador Pesticides Coalition, Canadian Cancer Society, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment and the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association.

October 1, 2009
St. John’s, NL - The Newfoundland and Labrador Pesticides Coalition is pleased to share the results of a recent poll, commissioned by the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association (NLMA) and the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment (CAPE), which asked residents of this province about the use of cosmetic pesticides.
The poll indicates that the majority of people (68 percent) either mostly or completely support a ban of cosmetic pesticides. The majority (72 percent) of those surveyed also feel that lawn pesticides used in their communities threaten the environment. While the greatest majority (76 percent) of those surveyed believe that lawn pesticides used in their community threaten children’s health. On another positive note, when compared to the 2006 Statistics Canada survey, it appears that pesticide use is declining.
"The people of this province are saying lawn pesticides threaten the most important things in their lives: the environment and their children," says Gideon Forman, Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. "And that's why they are calling on the Provincial Government to ban these toxic chemicals."
The coalition is particularly pleased to be able to share these results as they have secured a meeting with the Honorable Charlene Johnson, Minister of Environment and Conservation and the Honorable Paul Oram, Minister of Health and Community Services to discuss the issue of a cosmetic pesticide ban.
“Public education remains an important piece in calling for a ban on the use and sale of cosmetic pesticides,” says Emma Housser, Policy Analyst, Canadian Cancer Society – Newfoundland and Labrador Division. “Pairing awareness of the issue and knowledge regarding healthy alternatives with solid legislation will help to protect the people of this province from these potentially harmful chemicals.”
As we leave summer behind and enter into the fall months there are a few things that everyone can do to maintain a healthy lawn and garden in order to prepare it for the winter and allow for optimal health in the spring and summer:
  • Fall is the best time to plant new seed and thicken up your lawn;
  • Aerate – this will loosen up the soil and feed the roots;
  • Fewer weeds in the fall will mean less weeds to compete with newly planted grass in the spring; and
  • Use compost or all-organic fertilizer in the fall to feed the roots of your lawn.
These results were commissioned by the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association and the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment on the CRA Atlantic Quarterly®, an independent survey of Atlantic Canadians, and are based on a sample of 401 adult Newfoundland and Labrador residents. The survey was conducted from August 11 to August 29, 2009 with results for the province accurate to within plus or minus 4.9 percentage points in 95 out of 100 samples.
Media Contacts
  • Emma Housser
    CCS (NL) Policy Analyst
    Telephone (709) 753-6520
  • Gideon Forman
    CAPE Executive Director
    130 Spadina Ave., Suite 301
    Toronto, CANADA M5V 2L4
    Telephone (416) 306-2273
    Facsimile (416) 960-9392
    www.cape.ca
  • Lynn Barter
    NLMA Director, Communications & Public Affairs
    Telephone (709) 726-7424 (306)
    Toll Free (800) 563-2003 (306)
    Cell (709) 727-6153
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CBC Online Poll - Your thoughts on toxic pesticides...

Feb 21, 2011
CBC News

Groups renew call for N.L. pesticide ban

Groups in Newfoundland and Labrador are calling for cosmetic pesticides to be banned.Groups in Newfoundland and Labrador are calling for cosmetic pesticides to be banned. (CBC)

Opponents of pesticide use hope Newfoundland and Labrador's new environment minister will help push through a ban on the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides.

Cancer, reproductive issues and neurological disorders are some of the health affects that may be linked to pesticide exposure.

John Ridgely, of Mount Pearl, believes chemicals on a neighbours lawn caused him to have an allergic reaction.

"My throat started closing. Found it difficult to breathe," he said. "It was very frightening and very scary."

A group is calling for a ban on the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides in this province.

Ridgely also developed a rash. He sent pictures of it to every city councillor in Mount Pearl.

"If you took a blow torch and burned my chest that might describe it," he said.

The Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides has been calling for the ban in Newfoundland and Labrador for many years.

Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador, the Cancer Society, the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association and other organizations had been asking the former minister of Environment and Conservation, Charlene Johnson, for a ban since 2009.

Ross Wiseman became the Environment minister in a cabinet shuffle last month.

"I don't want to put a day or a week on it, but I appreciate the length of time this has been in the public domain and discussed," Wiseman said. "I appreciate too that there's an upcoming summer a time when these pesticides are used."

He said he hopes to bring forward a recommendation to cabinet in the very near future.

Newfoundland and Labrador is the only Atlantic province that hasn't banned the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides.

-----------------


CBC Online Poll - Your thoughts?

Yes. Ban them

No. It should be my choice

Let's study the issue

I'm with former mayor Andy Wells, I'd drink a cup of it

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2011/02/21/nl-pesticides-wiseman-221.html Best Blogger Tips
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Sunday, February 20, 2011

Pesticide personal protective equipment



What are some general guidelines concerning PPE and pesticides?
Use personal protective equipment appropriate for the pesticide in use.
Pesticides, herbicides, and other pest control products vary widely in their toxicity. They can be severely irritating or corrosive to the skin or even cause death. Some are also readily absorbed through intact skin and can represent the major route of exposure.
Many pesticides are handled as powders that can form airborne dust and may be inhaled. Other pest control products may be sprayed and form mists in the air. Some formulations contain volatile solvents that can evaporate forming a vapour that may be hazardous above certain airborne concentrations.
Therefore, it is very important to follow the manufacturer's guidelines regarding the personal protective equipment and clothing made of suitable material for use with the specific pesticide. Refer to the OSH Answers document Designing an Effective Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program for further information.
Please see the OSH Answers series on Pesticides for more information about how to work safely with pesticides, first aid, labels, re-entry time, etc.

What should I know about PPE clothing for use with pesticides?
  • Depending on the specific pesticide and how the pesticide is being used, use chemical protective clothing when there is:
    • chance of spilling or splashing liquids or
    • contact with spray.
  • Start each day in clean protective clothes that are free of holes or other defects.
  • Wear loose-fitting protective clothing - a size slightly larger than needed in order to reduce stretching at seams.
  • Secure protective pants outside of boots.
  • Wear an apron that extends below boot tops when mixing and loading liquid pesticides.
  • Wear boots made of appropriate chemical-protective material, not leather.

What are some tips for using other PPE?
Respiratory Protection
  • Choose an approved respirator according to fit, chemical and amount of likely exposure.
  • Refer to the OSH Answers documents Respirator Care and Respirator Selection for further information.
Headwear
  • Wear waterproof, washable material. Do not use leather or cloth sweatbands.
  • Choose helmets, hoods or hats that protect the head, neck and upper shoulders. Select CSA-approved safety hats with rain trough brim.
Eye Wear
  • Wear chemical goggles and a face shield when mixing or spraying pesticides.
Gloves
  • Wear durable, chemical protective gauntlet gloves which extend up the forearm. Follow the manufacturer's guidelines regarding suitable glove material.
  • Do not wear leather, paper or fabric gloves. These materials absorb and hold liquids and dusts and can become a serious source of exposure.

How can I reduce the chances of contamination?
  • Stand upwind of all spraying operations.
  • Follow manufacturer's instructions to prevent getting pesticides on your hands when removing contaminated gloves.
  • Wear a light pair of disposable protective gloves under the outer gloves. Discard the disposables after each use.
  • Wear relatively loose-fitting outer gloves for easy removal.
  • Store contaminated clothing separately from the family clothing.
  • Launder professionally or according to manufacturer's recommendations.

What, in general, should I do if my skin or clothing becomes contaminated?
  • Remove all contaminated clothing immediately.
  • Follow MSDS or label first-aid advice for skin/eye contact.
  • Scrub the contaminated area vigorously with soap and water.
  • Wash entire body, including hair, with soap and water.
  • Rinse with clean water for at least 15 minutes.
  • Rinse eyes if pesticide gets in them, at eye-wash station or with clean water and obtain medical attention.
  • Any co-workers who help you should wear gloves and rubber boots and take precautions to prevent contaminating themselves.
  • Contaminated clothing should be bagged and tagged, indicating which pesticide product was used.
  • Clean contaminated clothing, or discard if contaminated with a very toxic pesticide, as recommended by the pesticide manufacturer.
  • When laundering contaminated clothing, wear chemical-resistant gloves when handling the contaminated clothing (and decontaminate them after handling the clothing and before removing the gloves).
  • Launder contaminated clothing separately from the regular family laundry; rinse or pretreat the contaminated clothing before washing it in hot water; re-wash two or three times, as recommended; rinse the washing machine after washing the contaminated clothing.
  • Leather products (e.g., shoes, boots, belts) cannot be decontaminated and should be discarded in an approved manner as hazardous waste.
  • Read the label information and MSDS before using the pesticide product to find out if it can be absorbed through intact skin and be able to recognize toxic effects you may experience if you are exposed. Some acute or short-term effects can start right after exposure; other effects can be delayed from several hours to several days.
  • Obtain medical attention if you feel unwell, or if recommended in the MSDS or in other manufacturer information. Take the MSDS or other manufacturer information with you. Medical staff will need the information to treat you correctly.

http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/landscaping/pesticides.html


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Saturday, February 19, 2011

BCLocalNews.com - Industry group misleads citizens

BCLocalNews.com - Industry group misleads citizens

Published: February 19, 2011 6:00 AM

Updated: February 19, 2011 6:11 AM

Dear Sir:

Re: “Canccer society wrong on anti-pesticide stance,” by Lorne Hepworth, President of CropLife Canada, the pesticide industry's lobby group in Ottawa, which was published on line on Feb. 17, 2011.

Shame on this industry lobbyist for misleading the citizens of Terrace.

Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) has no labs of its own and is basing its verdicts almost exclusively on rat studies provided by the industry.

The PMRA has a very limited capability to assess human studies. Thus the PMRA's pesticide review is neither rigorous nor comprehensive.

To say that the health of Canadians is Health Canada's top priority under current circumstances is simply laughable.

K. Jean Cottam,

Ottawa, Ontario Best Blogger Tips
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telegraphjournal.com - Who needs municipal reform? | Daniel Bourgeois and David Gingras - Breaking News, New Brunswick, Canada

"...Cosmetic pesticides provide another example. Shediac, Caraquet, Sackville and St. Andrews banned pesticide use for cosmetic purposes within their respective towns, even if they did not have the authority to do so. Since no one contested the bylaws, the province was forced to intervene to prevent a legal vacuum. It banned 200 different pesticide products and recognized Integrated Pesticides Management as the law of the land, thereby making the progressive efforts of the four more aggressive towns virtually meaningless.
Had the Municipalities Act been permissive, the debates would have been resolved in town halls - taking into account the concerns of the local community."
telegraphjournal.com - Who needs municipal reform? | Daniel Bourgeois and David Gingras - Breaking News, New Brunswick, Canada Best Blogger Tips
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US: Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage | Pesticides | US EPA

Pesticide Industry Sales and Usage | Pesticides | US EPA Best Blogger Tips
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Friday, February 18, 2011

Pesticides Damage Thyroid Gland, Damage Metabolism | Care2 Healthy & Green Living

Pesticides Damage Thyroid Gland, Damage Metabolism | Care2 Healthy & Green Living Best Blogger Tips
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New Study Reveals Dangers of Prenatal Pesticide Exposure - New America Media

New Study Reveals Dangers of Prenatal Pesticide Exposure - New America Media Best Blogger Tips
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2 Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's in Study

2 Pesticides Linked to Parkinson's in Study Best Blogger Tips
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Strong call for pesticide ban - St. John's Telegram

February 18, 2011St. John's Telegram

Strong call for pesticide ban


Gideon Forman, executive director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment speaks Thursday night at St. John's City Hall to a public forum on the banning of lawn pesticides.
Gary Hebbard/The Telegram


http://www.thetelegram.com/News/Local/2011-02-18/article-2252474/Strong-call-for-pesticide-ban/1


Colin MacLean

One day as John Ridgley was working in the garden of his Mount Pearl home he caught a whiff of some of the pesticides that had been used recently on his neighbour’s lawn. After about 10 minutes of exposure Ridgley went into anaphylactic shock.

Today he carries an EpiPen and had it with him Thursday night as he joined around 45 other residents at St. John’s City Hall to discuss bringing a ban on cosmetic pesticides to Newfoundland and Labrador. “What else does the government need?”

Ridgley said as he addressed the crowd. Shortly after his incident Ridgley sent pictures of his allergic reaction ridden body to the minister of environment and conservation at the time and asked for a ban on cosmetic pesticides to be considered. He received a letter in response saying the issue was under study.

To say Ridgley was unsatisfied with this response would be putting it mildly. “The political will is not there right now to change this,” he said. Ridgley had a chance to share his story because of Thursday night’s forum, which was organized by the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides-Newfoundland and Labrador (CAP-NL).

The cities of Mount Pearl and St. John’s have voluntarily refrained from using pesticides on their green spaces for a few years, but neither city is allowed to pass an outright ban on its own because in Newfoundland and Labrador, the province must undertake such action. Councillors from both cities attended the meeting and added their voices to push for a ban.

Discussion at the forum revolved around what can be done to convince the provincial government that a ban on cosmetic pesticides is needed. “I’m not just talking about some skin defects, but some very serious health risks.” - Gideon Forman, executive director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment Guest speaker Gideon Forman, executive director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment.

Forman and his organization were instrumental in the successful lobbying of a cosmetic pesticide ban in Ontario. Ontario’s ban influenced several other provinces, including all of the Maritimes and Quebec, to implement their own bans. Forman told the audience that a ban on cosmetic pesticides was a good all around decision for this province, especially for health-related reasons. “I’m not just talking about some skin defects, but some very serious health risks,” he said.

Studies have shown possible links between pesticides, including herbicides, fungicides and insecticides, to neurological problems, birth defects and cancer. One of the other major concerns people tend to have with the idea of a ban is what would happen to lawn care companies, he added. “We want the industry to grow; we just don’t want them to use poisons to do it.”

It should be noted that Forman, along with other speakers, added there is a lack of rock-solid evidence in terms of scientific studies linking pesticides to major health problems. However, Forman also said there is enough evidence and enough doubt to show a ban is warranted as a preventative measure.

Gideon Forman, executive director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment speaks Thursday night at St. John's City Hall to a public forum on the banning of lawn pesticides.

cmaclean@thetelegram.com

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Nutri-Lawn Offers Ecologically Safe Solutions in Response To Provincial Pesticide Ban

In Ontairo...Why not in Newfoundland???

Nutri-Lawn Offers Ecologically Safe Solutions in Response To Provincial Pesticide Ban


Nutri-Lawn Offers Ecologically Safe Solutions in Response To Provincial Pesticide Ban

Established and experienced in the realm of minimizing or eliminating the use of pesticides, Nutri-Lawn offers sound solutions for homeowners who may feel at a loss for solutions to maintain their home lawn, when the new provincial Cosmetic Pesticide

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PRLog (Press Release)Apr 23, 2009 – Toronto, Ontario, -- The Ontario government has passed provincial legislation this month that will ban the sale and use of 250 commonly used products and 85 pesticide ingredients used for cosmetic lawn care. This comprehensive pesticide ban eliminates most of the chemicals that the do-it-yourself homeowner has used in the past to curb weed growth and control insect infestations. Many homeowners fear that the ban of pesticides will be the end of their green lawns, and the return of dandelions, crab grass, allergies, lawn diseases, and pesky insects.

Established and experienced in the realm of minimizing or eliminating the use of pesticides, Nutri-Lawn offers sound solutions for homeowners who may feel at a loss for solutions to maintain their home lawn, when the new provincial Cosmetic Pesticide Ban removes their ability to use these familiar products. The ban goes into effect on April 22, 2009, and will have immediate implementation. Ontario’s lawn care specialists, Nutri-Lawn, say they welcome the challenges presented by the new legislation and have the experience to thrive in this new market. The twenty year old company views the change as an opportunity for further environmental responsibility and business growth.

“Nutri-Lawn has the products, the processes, and the people to meet every need for this new legislation in Ontario.” President Ryan Vincent explained. “Experience and expertise matter now more than ever, and we are ready to serve the communities of Ontario as the trusted partner in environmentally correct lawn care.”

Nutri-Lawn has been practicing pesticide reduced and natural lawn care since day one in the 1980’s. On staff agronomists are continually testing new alternative products and methods of control for the pests that plague Ontario’s lawns. “We introduced the ‘Organics PLUS’ product line almost 10 years ago and since that date we have evolved the products and process’ used to meet the new demands of lawn care today” Shawn Karn, Agronomic Manager for the Nutri-Lawn franchise system described. “The program utilizes natural products, and has been responsible for successful lush ecology-friendly lawns since before the legislation was ever considered”.

When the banned lawn care products disappear from the shelves, using professionals with experience in organic lawn care may be the solution for homeowners who care about their lawns.

“We view this new legislation as an opportunity to expand our base of service,” Operations Manager Jordan Lavin said. “We’re the company that has solutions for these problems, and we are ready to service homeowners under these new regulations. Homeowners who want to keep their lawns green can trust Nutri-Lawn to assist them in these times of change. We have been practicing ecology friendly lawn care long before it was required or trendy.”

Press Release Distribution By Press Release Point

Contact:
Jordan Lavin
Nutri-Lawn
202-2077 Dundas St. E.
Mississauga, ON, L4X 1M2
416-525-4998
jlavin@nutrilawn.com
http://www.nutrilawn.com

# # #

About sustainability at Nutri-Lawn.
Nutri-Lawn is the leader in Canada’s environmental lawn care movement. They have treated weed and insect problems on a spot treatment basis to reduce chemical usage on their customer’s lawns since 1987. Nutri-Lawn is proud to support environmental programs that are important to customers, and have offered organic ecological programs since the 1990’s. For twenty years Nutri-Lawn has been the leader of ecologically responsible lawn care, and their core purpose is to nourish lawns and lives.
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Thursday, February 17, 2011

Orwellian doublespeak on cosmetic pesticides - Letters to the editor - Opinion - The Telegram

Orwellian doublespeak on cosmetic pesticides - Letters to the editor - Opinion - The Telegram

The letter from Lorne Hepworth, president of CropLife Canada and a well-known spokesman and lobbyist for the pesticide industry (“Pesticides have a role,” Feb. 12), is the best piece of Orwellian double-speak to appear in your paper in a long time. War is peace, love is hate, black is white, and pesticides protect human health and the environment.

The letter-writer Mr. Hepworth is responding to, whom he dismisses for suggesting a pesticide ban in Newfoundland and Labrador, just happens to be the province’s chief oncologist, Dr. David Saltman, who I’m sure understands much better than most the scientific evidence linking pesticides to cancer and other diseases.

The “activists” Mr. Hepworth refers to — those who support a ban on cosmetic (non-essential) pesticide use — include the following: the Canadian Medical Association, the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association, the B.C. Medical Association, the Ontario College of Family Physicians, the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, the Canadian Cancer Society, the Canadian Pediatric Society, the Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Association of Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and Labrador, plus all the

municipalities in Newfoundland and Labrador. The governments of Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island have already banned the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides. Even the Department of National Defence has banned their use on its bases!

Mr. Hepworth, of course, knows that the writing is on the wall for the developers, manufacturers and pedlars of non-essential toxins for lawns and gardens, i.e., the industry that he represents. He is no doubt only playing for time so that his industry’s stockpile of pesticides can be used up before Newfoundland and Labrador and the remaining Canadian provinces also enact bans against the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides.

Ironically, our provincial government proclaimed the Tobacco Health Care Costs Recovery Act just last week. Justice Minister Felix Collins stated that the purpose of the legislation is to “expose tobacco companies for misrepresenting the harm associated with their products.” After a Newfoundland and Labrador Pesticides Ban Act is proclaimed, hopefully this year, can a Pesticides Health Care Costs Recovery Act be far behind?

Paul Bowdring

St. John’s

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Friday, February 4, 2011

Why do we allow it? - Telegram St. John's

4 Feb 2011

The St. John’s Telegram

Why do we allow it?

A few years back, I noticed companies were using a toxic product here in Newfoundland which was banned by Health Canada.

I wanted to know why. I was tossed around from government department to department only to find out that while diazinon was indeed banned for use in the rest of Canada, the government decided to allow some uses here in Newfoundland while it “exhausted the supply.” Yes, we’ve become the Third World dumping ground for toxic chemicals. Why? Because we allow it, that’s why. I am ashamed at the number of people who are ignorant to the health and environmental effects of spreading toxic lawn chemicals all around our communities every summer.

Let it sink in people — lawn chemicals? Lawn chemicals which poison pets, people and the environment. Is there any need?

Obviously, the rest of Canada does not think so since more than 80 per cent of Canada’s population has protection. Are we going to be the dumping ground for companies to dump chemicals which are unwanted in the rest of Canada?

Local and national doctors and specialists will be key speakers at a public forum sponsored by the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides Newfoundland and Labrador (CAP-NL), which will be held on Feb. 17.

This very informative event will take place in the Foran Room at St. John’s City Hall at 7 p.m.

When Canada’s most respected health authorities tell us pesticides threaten our health, we should all be listening. Here is your chance to listen learn and discuss the serious pesticide issue in Newfoundland.

Judie Squires
Portugal Cove

http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Letters-to-the-editor-13424 Best Blogger Tips
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Thursday, February 3, 2011

PUBLIC FORUM - Be there

Newfoundland is the only province in Atlantic Canada without protection from toxic pesticides & over 80% of Canadians now have protection...


Local & National Doctors & experts will discuss this important issue.


PUBLIC FORUM

WHY NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR SHOULD BAN PESTICIDES IN 2011



GUEST SPEAKER:

Gideon Forman, Executive director, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment


PANELISTS:

Dr. David Saltman, Oncologist

Dr. Ian Simpson

Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides NL (CAP-NL)

Matthew Piercy, Executive Director, Canadian Cancer Society

Mayor Randy Simms, Mount Pearl

Craig Pollett, Executive Director, Municipalities NL

Moderator: Councilor Sheilagh O'Leary, ST. John's


Where: E.B Foran Room, St. John's City Hall

When: Thursday, February 17th, 2011 7:00pm

Sponsored by CAP-NL

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St. John's Daily Spray Advisory

My Past Articles

More enforcement needed for pesticide spray regulations
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 413 words
Karen Griffin - Judie Squires says someone needs to patrol the companies that spray residential areas for pesticides because she's observed nine violations of the Environmental Protection Act in her Paradise neighborhood alone


Spray woes: Province falling down on monitoring pesticides
The Telegram (St. John's) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 253 words
Judie Squires - environment to become poisoned? A temporary ban on all residential pesticides has to be put into place, to protect us, our wildlife and our environment as a whole. Judie Squires Paradise


Government lax on cosmetic pesticide regulation: advocate
The Telegram (St. John's) - 08-28-2004 - 613 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic the province will ban cosmetic use


Woman doesn't expect cosmetic pesticide ban any time soon
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - 08-30-2004 - 712 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic that the province will ban the


Province lagging behind in pesticide control
The Telegram (St. John's) - 09-04-2005 - 496 words
Squires, Judie - it to do is to prohibit the cosmetic use of synthetic pesticides altogether in order to protect our citizens and the environment. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


The two sides to pesticide use
The Telegram (St. John's) - 07-16-2006 - 781 words
Judie Squires - health of your families. When Canada's most respected health authorities tell us pesticides threaten our health, we should all be listening. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


Inquiry implicates BTk
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 353 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - of trees. The live spores can be inhaled by humans and animals exposed to BT. Judie Squires, secretary of the Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, says despite claims that


Delayed pesticide laws 'disappointing'
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 833 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - at the end of this year. These products will only be sold to certified dealers. Judie Squires, secretary of the newly formed Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, isn't


Above Articles available through Trancontinental Newsnet

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation
The Telegram (St. John's) - 03-14-2009 - 419 words
pesticides. Please join me in lobbying our province for a pesticide ban Judie Squires Portugal Cove...

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