Friday, April 29, 2011

Endosulfan Banned Worldwide | Latest News | Chemical & Engineering News

Endosulfan Banned Worldwide | Latest News | Chemical & Engineering News Best Blogger Tips
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BCLocalNews.com - Pesticide use creeps in as election issue

BCLocalNews.com - Pesticide use creeps in as election issue

Concerns about health and medicare said to be instituted by former Saskatchewan premier Tommy Douglas as being a provincial responsibility rank high in this election. But are they provincial responsibilities?
Pesticides and pharmaceuticals are under Health Canada’s control. The legal principle in respect to them supports the laws of toxic torts – protective measures should be taken in the absence of scientific certainty, if in doubt don’t do it – and should be applicable to chemical companies as well as regulatory agencies.
That neurotoxic pesticides cause neurological deficits found in Alzheimers disease is absolutely certain. That such chemicals cause irreversible memory loss has been known since at least 1947. By 1986, eminent pesticide neuro-toxicologists were expressing deep concern that prenatal exposure to pesticides would lead to autism.
Promising some support for victims and families of those affected by pesticide poisoning is not good enough when the Crown and chemical companies are wholly liable. These matters must be taken into account in negotiating any new health accord.
Which candidate can best serve you in these matters? After last week’s all-candidates meeting I am not sure I can vote with a clear conscience for any of the candidates.
Ann Kuczerpa
Oak Bay Best Blogger Tips
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Thursday, April 28, 2011

Let's celebrate life - The Corner Brook Western Star - Dr. Ian Simpson

April 28, 2011

The Corner Brook Western Star

IN MY OPINION

Easter tells us that spring is here, and soon we will see the warning signs on the lawns advising us to keep children and pets away fro the poison. Wouldn’t it be a lovely Easter present from our government to our citizens, to be told that legislation is coming soon, just before the spray season?

Letter writer Ian Simpson

Dear Editor: I would like to send an Easter bouquet of thanks to the Ontario Minister of the Environment John Wilkinson for his recent good news.

Wilkinson said last week that pesticide levels in the 19 urban streams that are monitored by Ontario Department of Environment continue to drop.

Minister Wilkinson said last Wednesday that since 250 products were removed from store shelves in 2009, the concentration of the most common pesticides had dropped, including 2,4-D, one of the most common pesticides used in urban areas.

In fact the Ontario environment studies show that all four of the most commonly used pesticides show a very large drop in concentration in urban streams — from 78 per cent to 97 per cent reduction.

The CBC reported that Wilkinson said “some additional products will no longer be readily accessible on store shelves.”

There has been some opposition to the ban on 2,4-D but the Ontario government is standing by its decision saying the people’s health is at risk.

So far six Canadian provinces — Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Alberta have restricted the use of cosmetic pesticides; and the current premier of British Columbia has made it clear that legislation in her province is a priority for her.

What a shame that it is taking so long for our Newfoundland and Labrador government to do the same thing, and bring legislation to our province.

The ministers of Health and the Environment have been aware of the science and health studies for a long time.

Minister Ross Wiseman, our minister of Environment, having recently met with concerned citizens, is doing due diligence and so no decision us likely in the immediate future.

But he has all the necessary information two years ago when he was minister of Health, so a decision on legislating pesticides should not be allowed to yet again be postponed indefinitely.

Easter tells us that spring is here, and soon we will see the warning signs on the lawns advising us to keep children and pets away fro the poison.

Wouldn’t it be a lovely Easter present from our government to our citizens, to be told that legislation is coming soon, just before the spray season?

Easter celebrates the return of life after the death of winter. Come on ministers Wiseman and Kennedy, let’s all celebrate life, not death.

Ian Simpson, Humber Village

http://www.thewesternstar.com/ Best Blogger Tips
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Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Oak Bay joins pesticide-ban wave

Oak Bay joins pesticide-ban wave Best Blogger Tips
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Thursday, April 21, 2011

Lower IQ in children linked to banned insecticide - Health - CBC News

Lower IQ in children linked to banned insecticide - Health - CBC News

A common household insecticide still having consequences 10 years later

Exposure in the womb to a common household insecticide is linked to deficits in IQ and working memory when the child reaches seven years old, a U.S. study has found.

Until banned for indoor residential use in the U.S. in 2001, chlorpyrifos was one of the most widely used insecticides for home use. Canada phased it out at around the same time for households but continues to allow it to fight mosquitoes in controlled environments.

Researchers from the Columbia Centre for Children's Environmental Health in New York report evidence of a link between prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos and lower scores on two different scales of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children at age seven. Virginia Rach, deputy director of the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, says the banned insecticide could still have implications for school performance. Courtsey of Columbia University.

On average, children who had exposures in the upper 25 per cent of the exposure distribution will score, on average, 5.3 points lower on the test of working memory, and 2.7 points lower on full-scale IQ, as compared to children in the lowest levels of exposure.

"Working memory problems may interfere with reading comprehension, learning and academic achievement, even if general intelligence remains in the normal range," said Virginia Rauh, lead author of the study.

The evidence suggests there is no threshold below which exposures are completely safe. Since the ban, exposure to chlorpyrifos has measurably declined.

The Columbia researchers had previously reported that, prior to the ban, chlorpyrifos was detected in 100 per cent of personal and indoor air samples, and 70 per cent of umbilical cord blood collected from babies. They also reported that the amount of chlorpyrifos in babies' blood was associated with neurodevelopmental problems at age three.

This is the first study to evaluate the neurotoxicity of prenatal chlorpyrifos at seven years of age.

The study was published online in Environmental Health Perspectives. Two other studies have also found early cognitive and behavioural effects associated with prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos.

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Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Government still examining pesticide ban - Newfoundland

19 Apr 2011

 The St. John’s Telegram

Government still examining pesticide ban

The provincial government is still studying a cosmetic pesticide ban, Environment Minister Ross Wiseman told the House of Assembly Monday.

During question period, Liberal Leader Yvonne Jones asked about the possibility of a ban, citing support from the Canadian Cancer Society, the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association, the Canadian Lung Association and the Newfoundland and Labrador Nurses’ Union. Wiseman said the government is taking its time to do it right. “It is an important issue,” he said. “It requires a lot of consideration. There are a number of implications in making any policy change in the province and any time we introduce legislation as a government it is not done frivolously. It is done as a result of a lot of analysis, a lot of due diligence on our part.”

http://www.thetelegram.com
      
==========================

April 18, 2011                     

Hansard - House of Assembly - Newfoundland and Labrador

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY PROCEEDINGS                 Vol. XLVI   No. 17

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Leader of the Opposition.

MS JONES: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Nalcor might be owned by the people, but the people did not have a say in putting $23 million in a hole in the oil – for looking for oil in Parsons Pond. Nor did they have a say, Mr. Speaker, on whether their light bills should be doubled up or not in this Province.

Mr. Speaker, for several years the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides has been asking the provincial government to implement a ban on cosmetic pesticides in the Province. Mr. Speaker, they have made representation to the government and the minister. The minister claims that he needs to do due diligence on this file and he needs some time to have a look at it, although he has been aware of it since he has been the Minister of Health.

I ask the minister today: What sort of commitment are you prepared to make on banning cosmetic pesticides in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador?

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Minister of Environment and Conservation.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

MR. WISEMAN: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

As I have said to the environmental groups who have come in to have a chat with me about this issue –because it is something that has been talked about a lot in Newfoundland and Labrador in recent years and because it is an important issue, I need to make sure that we fully understand the issues at hand, the implications of making any change in any legislation we have on the books in the Province.

The commitment I have made to them, that as a department we are in a process of doing some due diligence, evaluating the question at hand and when we are ready, I said I would bring forward to my Cabinet colleagues a recommendation as to how we might proceed as a Province. When that exercise has been concluded, Mr. Speaker, then we will be in a position to make an announcement for the people of the Province.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Leader of the Opposition.

MS JONES: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

This issue has been going on for the last two or three years, government has been aware of it. It is supported, Mr. Speaker, by the Canadian Cancer Society, by the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association, the Nurse’s Association, the Lung Association. There are many other groups, the Federation of Municipalities, even three of the largest cities in the Province, Mr. Speaker, have looked at this particular issue and supported it.

I ask the minister today: Will you not make a commitment to this particular group as it relates to cosmetic pesticides and will you do it in the course of the next few months?

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Minister of Environment and Conservation.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

MR. WISEMAN: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I thank the member opposite for listing off all of those who have an interest in it because it speaks to the sensitivities around the issue; it speaks to the complexity of the question and the issues that have been raised by those particular members and those organizations that they represent.

Let me repeat what I said a moment ago, Mr. Speaker, it is an important issue. It requires a lot of consideration. There are a number of implications in making any policy change in the Province and any time we introduce legislation as a government it is not done frivolously. It is done as a result of a lot of analysis, a lot of due diligence on our part. When we bring something to this House and introduce something to the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Newfoundlanders and Labradorians can be assured it has been well analyzed, we have done our due diligence and we will make the appropriate decisions in the best interest of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

http://www.assembly.nl.ca/business/hansard/ga46session4/2011-04-18.htm Best Blogger Tips
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Thursday, April 14, 2011

Advocacy Coalition to make Cosmetic pesticide ban a Provincial Election Issue for 2011

Media Release


Organization: Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides NL (CAP-NL)
Date: April 14, 2011

Advocacy Coalition to make Cosmetic pesticide ban a Provincial Election Issue for 2011



The advocacy group requesting legislation to ban cosmetic pesticide use in Newfoundland and Labrador are calling on all people across the province to make their vote count on this important health and environment issue when the ruling Conservative government of Kathy Dunderdale calls for an election this fall. A poll conducted in 2009 by the Newfoundland Medical Association shows that greater than 70% of people would be in favour of a pesticide ban for lawn and garden products similar to what is currently enacted in Ontario, Quebec, PEI, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides (CAP-NL) has met with both opposition parties and are encouraged by their interest and support. CAP-NL met with the Minister of the Environment on April 13, 2011 but they were unable to secure a firm commitment that the current government will pass legislation to protect our children and the environment from the harmful effects of non-essential pesticides.

CAP-NL anticipates that the pesticide ban issue will be a key factor in several ridings given the comprehensive support for such legislation in several municipalities, and with the endorsement of the healthcare professional organizations in the province and Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador. A ban on cosmetic pesticides will not only be good for our health and environment but also the lawn and garden industry, which saw an increase in the numbers of people working in that sector after bans in Toronto and Halifax.

For further information:

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Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Pesticide petition being reviewed - NL

13 Apr 2011

The Pilot

Pesticide petition being reviewed

BY PAM SNOW
THE PILOT

LEWISPORTE -

At the 2009 Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador’s Annual General Meeting in St. John’s, members unanimously supported a resolution from the City of Mount Pearl calling on the provincial government to ban the sale and use of cosmetic pesticides in the province.

MNL has conducted research and has been lobbying the government for the past 18 months. A petition was sent to council in hopes to further support the ban. The petition will be presented in the House of Assembly on April 18 in conjunction with those collected through the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides. The decision to display the petition/support the ban was deferred to the Environmental/Beautification committee for review. The committee will bring back a recommendation to council.

http://www.lportepilot.ca/
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Sunday, April 10, 2011

Industry’s war on nature: ‘What are the bees telling us?’

Industry’s war on nature: ‘What are the bees telling us?’

..." In a last ditch effort to save the hive, some bees seal off hive cells that contain inordinate amounts of pesticide. But even these hives eventually die." Best Blogger Tips
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Monday, April 4, 2011

The Cape Breton Post Pesticide ban is here

April 3, 2011

The Cape Breton Post

Pesticide ban is here

by Staff ~ The Cape Breton Post

“Do you dream of a perfect emerald lawn, stretching out in glorious, unbroken vistas, edged in a slightly bevelled edge at the sidewalk? It’s a lovely dream. You may want to keep that close to your heart, along with pedal-pushers, penny candy, and roller skates with metal wheels.”

That’s the introduction to a web page by HMK Consultants outlining ways to keep a lawn relatively weed-free without cosmetic pesticides. It was written when the City of Toronto implemented its cosmetic pesticide ban in 2006.

It appears as if the point of the tongue-in-cheek reference to the 1950s is that the “perfect” lawn belongs to that era and not this one.

That “innocent” decade was a time when cigarette smoking was truly “cool,” when drinking and driving was commonplace, and seat belt use was infrequent if seat belts were available at all.

Sixty years later, cigarette packages are about to feature ever more graphic photographs such as a lung cancer patient on her deathbed; drivers registering between 0.05 and 0.07 on a breathalyzer test for the first time face a seven-day licence suspension; and more than 90 per cent of occupants of “light-duty vehicles” in Canada buckle up.

What were cultural norms a couple of generations ago have been turned on their head.

The same goes for the “perfect” lawn, heavily dependent on cosmetic pesticides, fully embraced in the years following the Second World War when cookie-cutter suburbs were springing up all over North America.

Over the decades, as the innocence around chemicals has been lost, governments have implemented bans on cosmetic pesticides. Nova Scotia joined the long lineup on April 1 with a province-wide ban.

Now, Nova Scotia residents can only use pesticides such as Roundup and Sevin on lawns and ornamental plants if they’re trying to eradicate an invasive species such as Japanese knotweed, poisonous plants such as poison ivy, insects that cause structural damage such as carpenter ants, or insects that can be a health concern such as European fire ants.

There will likely be homeowners who tell vendors they have a invasive species on their property, when they don’t, and buy a prohibited pesticide to use on a non-invasive species. There will also likely be those who buy restricted pesticides elsewhere and apply them under the cover of darkness.

The new ban is more about educating Nova Scotians about the potential health implications (to humans, animals and plants) of applying cosmetic pesticides to get a lawn that looks like a golf course or a garden that looks like the cover of a seed catalogue.

As with cigarettes, drinking and driving, and seat belt use, the cultural shift of returning to organic approaches and re-defining a “perfect” yard will take time. But people (and the planet) will be better for it.

http://www.capebretonpost.com/Opinion/Editorial/2011-04-03/article-2397129/Pesticide-ban-is-here/1 Best Blogger Tips
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Saturday, April 2, 2011

Time for a cosmetic pesticide ban - The St. John’s Telegram

April 2,  2011

The St. John’s Telegram

Time for a cosmetic pesticide ban

BY BOB DIAMOND

Why is it taking so long for our provincial government to make a decision regarding banning the sale and use of pesticides for cosmetic purposes?

Close to 24 million Canadians, or 79.6 per cent of Canada’s total population, are presently benefiting from enhanced protection from unwanted exposure to synthetic lawn and garden pesticides.

This figure includes the best provincial protection provided under Ontario’s Cosmetic Pesticides Ban Act, 2008 and Quebec’s 2003 Pesticide Management Code as well as Nova Scotia’s, New Brunswick’s and P.E.I.’s Pesticide Acts.

Our former premier, Danny Williams, did an excellent job in promoting Newfoundland and Labrador as being a have province — no longer a poor cousin to the rest of Canada. However, on the issue of controlling and regulating environmental contaminants such as pesticides, we are lagging far behind nationally.

Back in 2003, the province’s Wellness Advisory Council prepared and submitted recommendations to the Minister of Health and Community Services which led to the development of the government policy document Achieving Health and Wellness: Provincial Wellness Plan. One of the eight Wellness Priorities in this plan was to create and maintain “environments which promote good public health” involving “those aspects of human health and disease that are determined by physical, chemical and biological factors in the environment such as contaminants in food, air, soil and water.”

Many seeking ban

Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador, the Cancer Society, the Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association and other organizations had been asking the former minister of Environment and Conservation, Charlene Johnson, for a ban since 2009.

However, this is far from a relatively new issue.

Over the past 12 years there have been many requests to our provincial health and environment ministers from health and environmental organizations and from individual citizens asking for improved legislation and regulation of pesticides.

Over a month ago, Environment Minister Ross Wiseman stated publicly that: “I don’t want to put a day or a week on it, but I appreciate the length of time this has been in the public domain and discussed.” Wiseman added: “I appreciate, too, that there’s an upcoming summer, a time when these pesticides are used.”

He also said he “hopes to bring forward a recommendation to cabinet in the very near future.”

Well the days, weeks, months and years are passing by and it looks like another spring and summer will soon be upon us when we — and our children, grandchildren and pets — will again be exposed to cosmetic pesticide contaminants in food, air, soil and water.

But maybe, hopefully, wishfully the ministers of Health and Environment are now working together on this issue and they will introduce in this session of the House new legislation similar to or better than Ontario’s.

This would also be a start to working on a priority in the provincial government’s Wellness Plan in promoting wellness through better protecting our environment, and us, from exposure to toxic pesticides.

Bob Diamond writes from Stephenville.

http://www.thetelegram.com Best Blogger Tips
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More support for a ban - The St. John’s Telegram

April 2, 2011

The St. John’s Telegram

More support for a ban

As a city councillor to the residents of our capital city, St. John’s, and as an active committee member of the Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides Newfoundland and Labrador, I feel compelled to promote the legislation of a ban on the use of nonessential pesticides in our province.

The statistics are regularly discussed in the public forum and there is incredible support for this initiative.

The ban of non-essential pesticides has been enacted in Ontario, Quebec and all Maritime provinces, as the documented hazards of these chemicals are well known.

Several polls have been conducted and they indicate approximately 70 per cent public support for a cosmetic pesticide ban to be enacted in our province.

Research also states that lawn care industries have not suffered as a result of this health-care initiative.

This causes me to ask why this province is taking so long to address what other provinces, national lawn care corporations and national health associations have already recognized as an essential step to human, animal and environmental health?

From the city’s perspective, we have been actively advising the public to reject the use of non-essential pesticides and our St. John’s city parks have eliminated their use for many years.

Last year, with the support of city council, I put forward a resolution to indicate the city’s desire to create a ban on cosmetic pesticides for lawn care.

As well, Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador and the City of Mount Pearl have been very active in requesting legislation from the province on this issue. To date, we have not had a clear response from the province.

Representing this beautiful province is a privilege and with it comes a great deal of responsibility to the health and well-being of our citizens and our environment.

Let’s not be a province that lags behind on important issues such as this.

I am hopeful that the government will show real leadership before the 2011 spray season begins, as I continue to do in the capital city, by addressing the risks involved in continuing to allow the use of these non-essential pesticides in our province.

Coun. Sheilagh O’Leary
St. John’s

http://www.thetelegram.com Best Blogger Tips
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St. John's Daily Spray Advisory

My Past Articles

More enforcement needed for pesticide spray regulations
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 413 words
Karen Griffin - Judie Squires says someone needs to patrol the companies that spray residential areas for pesticides because she's observed nine violations of the Environmental Protection Act in her Paradise neighborhood alone


Spray woes: Province falling down on monitoring pesticides
The Telegram (St. John's) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 253 words
Judie Squires - environment to become poisoned? A temporary ban on all residential pesticides has to be put into place, to protect us, our wildlife and our environment as a whole. Judie Squires Paradise


Government lax on cosmetic pesticide regulation: advocate
The Telegram (St. John's) - 08-28-2004 - 613 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic the province will ban cosmetic use


Woman doesn't expect cosmetic pesticide ban any time soon
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - 08-30-2004 - 712 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic that the province will ban the


Province lagging behind in pesticide control
The Telegram (St. John's) - 09-04-2005 - 496 words
Squires, Judie - it to do is to prohibit the cosmetic use of synthetic pesticides altogether in order to protect our citizens and the environment. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


The two sides to pesticide use
The Telegram (St. John's) - 07-16-2006 - 781 words
Judie Squires - health of your families. When Canada's most respected health authorities tell us pesticides threaten our health, we should all be listening. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


Inquiry implicates BTk
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 353 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - of trees. The live spores can be inhaled by humans and animals exposed to BT. Judie Squires, secretary of the Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, says despite claims that


Delayed pesticide laws 'disappointing'
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 833 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - at the end of this year. These products will only be sold to certified dealers. Judie Squires, secretary of the newly formed Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, isn't


Above Articles available through Trancontinental Newsnet

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation
The Telegram (St. John's) - 03-14-2009 - 419 words
pesticides. Please join me in lobbying our province for a pesticide ban Judie Squires Portugal Cove...

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