Tuesday, May 31, 2011

NAFTA pesticide ban challenge settled without money - Montreal - CBC News

NAFTA pesticide ban challenge settled without money - Montreal - CBC News

No compensation for DowAgroSciences after Quebec outlaws lawn pesticide
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The 2011 Pesticide Spray Advisory for the St. John's region will begin tomorrow.


What is the Spray Advisory?

The Pesticide Spray Advisory is a safer neighbourhood watch program.  Over 80% of Canadians are protected from toxic synthetic pesticides yet Newfoundland and Labrador have not enacted legislation to protect the people of our province from the harmful effects of these substances.  Not only do we not have the same level of protection as other provinces, our government has been turning a blind eye to pesticide misuse in this province for many years.  I developed the Pesticide Spray Advisory in 2004 as free public service and awareness campaign.  

This advisory reports the daily weather conditions as forecast on Environment Canada's website between 6:30am and 8:00am for the St. John's Region.  The daily Pesticide Spray Advisory includes weather regulations and other rules that prohibit or restrict pesticide use. Included are tips based on federal & provincial regulations as well as healthy garden hints.

The daily advisory will run from June 1st and will conclude on October 1st, however the information on the website will be maintained year-round as pesticides are often sprayed outside this time frame.

The Pesticide Spray Advisory has evolved into a neighbourhood watch program.  Citizens now have the tools they need from the information provided in this advisory to report pesticide abuse in the province. 

What is Pesticide abuse?

Millions of pounds of pesticides are sprayed by "professional" applicators in this province in each short summer season.  This does not include the pesticides which homeowners apply themselves.  The toxic drift and leaching from pesticides affects our health, our children, wildlife and the environment.

Because of the inclement weather in Newfoundland, there are very few days when pesticides can be legally applied.  

Pesticide applicators are expected to follow all provincial, federal and municipal regulations.   These regulations have been put into place to provide minimal protection for our health, the environment, the operators and the public at large.

Yet, every year the Annual Pesticide Summary, available through the Department of Environment & Conservation shows enormous amounts of pesticides being used.  With very few days when pesticides can be properly applied, this affirms that applicators are misusing pesticides and our government are letting us, our children, our pets, our water and our environment be exposed to these invisible toxic substances. (http://sprayadvisory.webs.com/commonpesticides.htm)

Federal, provincial & municipal governments are responsible for regulating pesticides. The federal government, through Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency, is responsible for registration and classification of pesticides. The provincial government is responsible for ensuring those pesticides are used in an acceptable manner as outlined under the province’s Pesticide Control Regulations as well as restricting the sale and use of certain pesticides and Municipal Governments can place additional by-laws to further restrict pesticide use to protect their local citizens and the environment.  

Our government should be by following the advice of the many heath care professionals by prohibiting use of synthetic pesticides and promoting alternative lawn and garden care for the protection of our citizens and the environment.

What are the regulations?

While there are many rules and regulations for pesticide use, I will cover more in the daily advisory, some of the more common regulations which are often not followed are:

Weather Conditions:

Wind speeds: Wind must be between 2 and 15 km/hr for lawn applications & winds must be between 2 and 10km/hr for trees taller than 3 meters. Air Temperature: temperature must be below 25oC. Rain: It must not raining nor is rain anticipated over the next 2 hour period. Humidity: The relative humidity must be above 50%.

Water Body Buffer Zones:

Pesticide regulations and labels state not to contaminate water bodies and wells, many pesticides can not be sprayed near water and residential wells.

24hr Neighbor Notification:

When a pesticide spray activity is to occur, the applicator must give verbal or written notification to all neighboring properties within 15 meters 24 hours in advance of the spray activity. The notification must include the common name/trade name of the pesticide, the active ingredient(s) and the type of pest controlled.
 
When given this notification, neighbors should be aware to close all windows, turn off the heat recovery & ventilation units in their home, take in clothing from the line as well as children’s toys and do not allow children or pets to play in the area in order to help reduce the risk of exposure

Operators must wear personal protective equipment:

All pesticide applicators must wear their protective safety equipment when mixing, loading or applying pesticides. This includes protective coveralls, chemical resistant boots and gauntlet gloves, head and neck protection and an approved mask. The label, material safety data sheet and OHS offers information on the types of protective equipment necessary to reduce applicator exposure.  Sadly, many do not.

How you can help:

You can follow the Spray Advisory Daily Blog at http://sprayadvisory.blogspot.com/.  The Pesticide Spray Advisory will offer you the tools to help ensure that the current regulations are enforced until such time our government sees fit to protect us entirely from the dangers of these toxic substances.  If you see a company or individual applying pesticides in violation to any regulations you can immediately call the pesticide control department to try and stop the activity and file a report to the Department of Environment & Conservation.  You can also inform your town council office as well as your MHA.  More details on reporting violations are available on the website. http://sprayadvisory.webs.com/

Won't that make me a snitch or a bad neighbor?

No.  You wouldn't sit back and watch someone vandalizing  or trespassing on your neighbors property or hurting their children and pets.  This neighborhood watch program helps everyone.  Pesticides applied in a wrongful manor can cause damage and contamination to property on which it is applied, drifts onto neighboring properties which causes toxic trespass, plant damage, water pollution, exposes citizens including children commuting and playing in the neighborhood, and harms pets and wildlife.

Reporting such violations will help keep your neighborhood safer for everyone.  Nobody wants to pay a company to pollute or damage their property.  Your neighbor will likely be thankful that you helped protect their property.

Reporting illegal pesticide activity helps everyone including the applicators themselves as many of them are young and unknowingly exposing themselves to toxic substances. 

For more information and to follow the Pesticide Spray Advisory:


Let's put a stop to pesticide abuse in our province and make this a safer summer..

--
Spray Advisory

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Saturday, May 28, 2011

NAFTA - Deal confirms government’s right to ban ‘cosmetic' pesticides, minister says

Friday, May. 27, 2011 9:56PM EDT

Deal confirms government’s right to ban ‘cosmetic' pesticides, minister says

by BARRIE MCKENNA

OTTAWA— Globe and Mail Update

Governments in Canada can continue restricting so-called “cosmetic” pesticides and weed killers in spite of the settlement of a closely watched NAFTA trade case, federal Trade Minister Ed Fast says.

On Thursday, U.S.-based Dow AgroSciences LLC settled a $2-million (U.S.) lawsuit stemming from Quebec’s 2006 ban of the pesticide 2,4-D, used in products such as Killex.

Dow agreed to drop its case, and in return, Quebec acknowledged that 2,4-D does not “pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment.”

Mr. Fast said the deal confirms the right of governments to regulate the use of pesticides in Canada.

“This right will not be compromised by Canada’s participation in NAFTA or any other trade agreement,” he said in a statement on Friday.

Dow, which makes the pesticide, said a deal to drop its North American free trade agreement challenge vindicates its contention that the product is safe if used as directed.

“Quebec’s decision never had a basis in science,” said Brenda Harris, the company’s Calgary-based manager of regulatory and government affairs. “And it cast a shadow on the safety of our product.” Ms. Harris said the case is about making sure governments are “transparent in their decision-making.”

In a statement, Quebec said its ban remains firmly in place and that 2,4-D continues to be a restricted chemical.

The pesticide 2,4-D is prohibited for lawn care in most provinces east of Manitoba as part of a much broader prohibition on so-called cosmetic lawn care products. The chemical is still widely used in agriculture and forestry. It’s also sold for cosmetic uses in the four western provinces and throughout the United States, Europe and Asia.

In justifying the ban, Quebec had initially identified 2,4-D as a possible carcinogen – a claim it failed to demonstrate. And that put the province at odds with Health Canada, which deems the product safe, sparking the company’s NAFTA case against the federal government. Claims can only be brought against NAFTA’s three signatories – Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Lisa Gue of the David Suzuki Foundation said the settlement would have little effect because even the threat of a NAFTA challenge did not dissuade provinces from banning the chemical. She also suggested the company may have withdrawn its lawsuit because it feared it would ultimately lose the case.

In 2009, Dow filed a challenge under NAFTA’s chapter 11, which allows companies to sue governments for actions that affect their investments. The company was seeking $2-million (U.S.) in damages. No cash was involved in this week’s final settlement.

For its part, Quebec agreed to a statement that “products containing 2,4-D do not pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment, provided that the instructions on their label are followed.”

More significantly, the repudiation of Quebec’s health warning helps the company protect a much larger market for the product in farm and forestry use, worth at least $120-million (Canadian) a year.

The pesticide, used since the 1940s, is popular because it’s relatively cheap compared to other newer chemicals that are still protected by patents.

According to Didier Bicchi, the Quebec Ministry of the Environment’s director of agriculture and pesticides, 2,4-D will continue to be prohibited in Quebec because the government has found the product to be “non-essential” as a weed killer in the province.

“The Pesticide Management Code remains as is. The ingredient 2,4-D continues to be prohibited in the province. The situation for the company’s product hasn’t changed. The only difference is that it will no longer be labelled as a dangerous product,” Mr. Bicchi said in an interview.

According to the government expert, the settlement may eventually help the company fight a potential ban being considered by other provinces.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/deal-confirms-governments-right-to-ban-cosmetic-pesticides-minister-says/article2038340/
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Friday, May 27, 2011

Organic Lawn Care For the Cheap and Lazy

Organic Lawn Care For the Cheap and Lazy Best Blogger Tips
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Thursday, May 26, 2011

CBC Here & Now NL (Make a pesticide ban in NL an election issue)

Sheilagh O'Leary interviewed about the cosmetic use of pesticides:

http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/Local_News/NL/1317907201/ID=1947090267

The story is at 0:3:40 (3 minutes and 40 seconds)
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Sunday, May 22, 2011

SPRAY BAN may be coming - Winnipeg Free Press

05/21/2011

Winnipeg Free Press

SPRAY BAN may be coming
Cosmetic herbicides, pesticides could be outlawed

By: Mary Agnes Welch

MANITOBA could soon join nearly every other province and ban cosmetic pesticides, the chemicals in sprays like WeedEx and RoundUp that keep lawns perfect by zapping weeds and bugs.

"I'm certainly open to it," said Conservation Minister Bill Blaikie. "The government is considering what steps might be taken in terms of public consultation."

The move comes after Blaikie asked the province's round table for sustainable development to study the issue of cosmetic pesticides. Last month, the round table came back with a call for a province-wide ban.

It's about time, say local and national environmental groups, including the David Suzuki Foundation.

According to a 2009 Statistics Canada survey, 47 per cent of Manitobans report using chemical pesticides to perfect their lawns and gardens. That's the second-highest rate in the country. Meanwhile, Manitoba is out of step with most other provinces in its failure to enact a province-wide ban on herbicides and insecticides used for cosmetic purposes.

This week, the David Suzuki Foundation released a report evaluating provincial pesticide bans and found Ontario and Nova Scotia's were the toughest.

Manitoba didn't even earn a passing mention in the report because the province has no legislation to review.

Manitoba is one of only four Canadian provinces with no pesticide ban and that club is about to shrink. British Columbia just finished a long round of public consultations on a possible ban and new Liberal Premier Christy Clark has said she supports one.

"It's just low-hanging fruit," said Lisa Gue, an environmental health policy analyst at the David Suzuki Foundation. "It's a completely needless exposure we can just do without."

Unlike dozens of municipalities in Canada, no Manitoba city has an all-out cosmetic pesticide ban.

"Currently, what we have is kind of behind the times," said Kristine Hunter, a University of Manitoba instructor in the department of environment and geography. "When you look at the evidence on pesticides, there is really strong evidence now about serious human harm. We're talking cancer and links to ALS."

But Hunter, who sits on the province's sustainability round table, says she senses a shift in political will.

"I'm the most hopeful I've been in 10 years of advocating for this," she said.

Local commercial lawn maintenance companies have traditionally resisted a pesticide ban, in part because it could damage their industry.

Dana Kapusta, co-owner of Nutri-Lawn in Winnipeg, proposes a compromise. He suggested the province ban the retail sale of chemical pesticides but continue to allow lawn-care companies to use them. Kapusta said professionals are trained to apply the pesticides sparingly and safely and ought to be allowed to continue to have access to at least some of the products.

And he said Manitobans might not be ready for the kind of weed and dandelion invasion that left some in Ontario grumbling the summer after that province banned cosmetic pesticides.

"A beautiful city will go to hell in a handbasket pretty quickly if the weeds aren't under control," said Kapusta.

Kapusta said his customers have already begun moving toward non-chemical pesticide alternatives.

Organic lawn care products are more expensive and take longer to apply, but he's seen a sixfold increase in the number of customers asking for Nutri-Lawn's organic product this summer over last.

Cities can ban the use of pesticides but only the province can ban the sale -- a much more effective method of reducing pesticide use.

A province-wide ban also makes enforcement much easier because inspectors only have to check a few home and garden stores, not every homeowner. And, it ensures the ban covers the entire province, not just a handful of cities.

A ban won't be in place in time for this gardening season, and Blaikie wouldn't guess when public consultations might begin. They could start before this October's provincial election.

Gue said there's no reason to delay.

"It's no longer a matter of reinventing the wheel," said Gue. "There are strong models that have been test driven in other province and the sky hasn't fallen. There are still lush and beautiful green spaces in all those provinces."

maryagnes.welch@freepress.mb.ca

BAN CHRONO

April 2003: Quebec introduces Canada's first province-wide pesticide ban that targeted 20 active ingredients. The use and sale of pesticides was phased out three years later. In 2009, a Statistics Canada survey found that only four per cent of Quebeckers reported using cosmetic pesticides.

March 2006: Brandon enacts a bylaw restricting cosmetic pesticide use near schools, daycares, parks and many other public spaces and requiring lawn-care companies to post warning signs when they apply chemicals.

May 2008: Winnipeg enacts some restrictions on pesticides, requiring lawn-care companies to post warning signs when they apply chemicals and allowing residents to request no-spray buffer zones.

June 2008: Ontario adopts what's widely seen as Canada's toughest and most comprehensive pesticide ban. It prohibits the use and sale of 96 active ingredients as well as the sale of 172 products.

Dec. 31, 2012: A federal ban on weed-and-feed kicks in. That's the combination product that fertilizes lawns while also killing weeds, and it's widely seen as overused, ineffective and environmentally damaging.

MAKE YOUR OWN BAN

-- Avoid any of these big baddies: 2,4-D mecoprop, dicamba, glyphosate, diazinon and carbaryl. Also avoid weed-and-feed. Even Alberta has banned that.

-- Tolerate a few weeds and dandelions, or pick them by hand.

-- To make your own insecticide, try mixing a tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap with a cup of vegetable oil to make a concentrate. Mix a couple of teaspoons of the concentrate with a cup of water in a spray bottle and apply to stems and both sides of plant leaves. Reapply after it rains.

-- Or, try the garlic remedy. Many bugs hate the smell. Soak half a cup of finely chopped garlic cloves in two cups water for about a day, then strain out the garlic into a spray bottle. Spray a fine mist over plants. To increase the potency of the insecticide, add crushed hot peppers or a tablespoon of dissolved pure soap to make the spray stick to the insect.

-- Try diatomaceous earth, a powdery white substance that you can buy at most garden stores. It's an abrasive that cuts the bodies of insects, but it's non-toxic.

-- To kill weeds, try vinegar. Boil a quart of water, add two tablespoons of salt and five tablespoons of vinegar. Pour directly on weeds on sidewalks and driveways while the mixture is still hot.

-- Source: Manitoba Eco Network

WHAT A BAN COULD LOOK LIKE

-- Wouldn't apply to farms or forestry, only lawns and other public green space.

-- Would likely list dozens of banned chemicals that can't be used or sold, along with a "white list" of products that are alright.

-- Probably wouldn't apply to golf courses, unless Manitoba was considering a much tougher ban than exists elsewhere. Golf courses are the next frontier of pesticide bans. Denmark is already on the case.

-- Wouldn't apply to pesticides used for health issues such as mosquitoes carrying the West Nile virus. Also would likely exempt indoor use of bug-killing sprays for things such as ant infestations or wasps who fly into a home.

-- Would probably exempt some herbicides used for dangerous plants such as poison ivy. In Ontario, homeowners can still buy some heavy-duty herbicides if they have a problem such as poison ivy, but the herbicides are kept under lock-and-key at home and garden stores.

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition May 21, 2011 J16

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/life/greenpage/spray-ban-may-be-coming-122381073.html
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Friday, May 20, 2011

The time is now - The St. John's Telegram

May 19, 2011 
  
The St. John's Telegram

The time is now

The signs of spring and recent lawn care on individual properties throughout the city prompt this letter in support of a ban on pesticide use on residential properties in Newfoundland.

Once sprayed or otherwise applied, the toxic properties of pesticides become airborne and enter our bodies, often through inhalation. I have personally noted pesticide residue that hangs in the air for a week or more. How? I can smell it when I walk by. The heat of summer intensifies the smell. Toxic trespass, that is, the buildup of unwanted chemicals in our body, has been linked to serious health effects such as infertility, birth defects, childhood and adult cancer. 

Children and women shoulder the heaviest burden of toxicity. Unborn children are at risk as toxins can pass from the mother to the unborn child in the womb, to result in the above mentioned birth defects.

Are not expectant mothers and their unborn children, along with every man, woman and child in our province, worth protecting by instating a ban on pesticides this summer?

Sally Rowsell
St. John’s

http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Letters-to-the-editor/2011-05-19/article-2518802/The-time-is-now/1 Best Blogger Tips
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Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Demand a strong law controlling pesticides - The Corner Brook Western Star

17 May 2011

The Corner Brook Western Star

Demand a strong law controlling pesticides

Dear Editor: 

The grandchildren will soon be running in with fistfuls of dandelion bouquets to give to Nanny.

I just have to be sure that they come from our property and that the little ones don’t run onto some lawn with the miniscule pesticide warning signs.

These signs, by the way, are merely a token gesture towards compliance with the law.

No one is allowed to spray poisons when the wind is more than 15 kilometers an hour, or in the 24 hours after a rain or when rain is forecast within the next 24 hours.

Adequate notice has to be given to adjacent property owners, as well.

In my experience, these regulations are broken quite routinely.

In any case, little children and pets, those most in danger from pesticides, cannot read the warnings.

As noted by Dr. Ian Simpson in his recent letter to The Western Star, the government of Newfoundland and Labrador is poised to enact some kind of legislation regarding the use of lawn chemicals.

Let us hope that they bring in a meaningful law and not some wishy-washy “ integrated pest management” nonsense, as the chemical companies are pressuring government to do.

Integrated pest management allows the use of poisons for cosmetic lawn care, so no change in current practices will take place.

I urge all people who are more interested in health and safety than in eradicating dandelions to tell your MHA to vote for strong anti-pesticide legislation and against integrated pest management.

Donald Gale
Stephenville

http://www.thewesternstar.com/Opinion/Letters-to-the-Editor-1766
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Saturday, May 14, 2011

Lobby for an anti-pesticide law - The St. John's Telegram

May 13, 2011 
  
The St. John's Telegram

Lobby for an anti-pesticide law

The grandchildren will soon be running in with dandelion bouquets for Nanny. I just have to be sure that they come from our property and that the little ones don’t run onto lawns with miniscule pesticide warning signs.

These signs are merely a token gesture towards compliance with the law. No one is allowed to spray poisons when the wind is more than 15 km/h, or 24 hours after a rain or when rain is forecast within 24 hours. Adequate notice has to be given to adjacent property owners. These rules are broken routinely by lawn care companies. In any case, little children and pets, those most in danger from pesticides, cannot read the warnings.

As noted by Dr. Ian Simpson in a recent letter, this province is poised to enact legislation regarding lawn chemicals. Let’s hope they bring in meaningful law and not some “integrated pest management” nonsense as chemical companies are pressuring them to do. Integrated pest management allows the use of poisons for cosmetic lawn care, so no change will take place.

If you are more interested in health and safety than in eradicating dandelions, tell your MHA to vote for strong anti-pesticide legislation and against integrated pest management.

Donald Gale
Stephenville

http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Letters-to-the-editor/2011-05-13/article-2503324/Lobby-for-an-anti-pesticide-law/1 Best Blogger Tips
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Wednesday, May 11, 2011

80% Decrease in Waterway Pesticide Pollution after Ontario pesticide ban...

May 9, 2011

The North Bay Nugget

Pesticide ban reflected in health of Chippewa Creek
Waterways studied over two summers

By PJ WILSON The Nugget

Chippewa Creek is showing little effect from decades of pesticide use in the city.

Ontario's Ministry of the Environment examined the creek over two summers, 2008 and 2009, as part of a study of 10 waterways across the province following a provincial ban on cosmetic pesticides.

North Bay had already banned pesticide use in most applications in 2005.

The report shows that overall, pesticides and pesticide components in the waterways dropped by 80% between 2008 — the year before the pesticide ban took effect — and 2009.

"I was surprised," says Peggy Walsh Craig, of Nipissing Environment Watch. "I didn't think it would happen that quickly."

She points out that many of the chemicals which had been used, such as 2,4-D, are not particularly persistent, and will disappear from the environment in a relatively short time. Yet the sudden, steep decrease was not expected.

"To tell you the truth, I was a lot more surprised the province did the study," she admits, and that it included a Northern Ontario waterway in it.

Nevertheless, she said, it was good how substantially the creek improved over the two years, particularly "without any downside to the general public."

The 39-page report, Changes in Urban Stream Water Pesticide Concentrations One Year After a Cosmetic Pesticides Ban, set out three objectives: To determine which pesticides were detectable, whether concentrations changed after the implementation of the ban and to compare concentrations of detected pesticides on aquatic ecosystems.

Waterways inspected include Frobisher Creek southwest of Sudbury, as well as Sawmill Creek near Ottawa and seven in southwestern Ontario.

The study looked at 105 different fungicides, herbicides, insecticides and degradates — the break-down of chemical compounds.

Walsh Craig said one possible variable, the weather, wasn't really a concern, as the weather in the summers of 2008 and 2009 was almost identical.

The study was also an opportunity to take a different look at the local waterway, she said.

"What is interesting is that this is the first time the creek has been assessed for what is in it. We were advocating so strongly for a (pesticide) ban in North Bay, but we didn't have the data. Now we do."

She said the fewer chemicals there are in the creek, the better it will be for the fish and wildlife which depend on it.

Unfortunately, she added, people are still using the creek as a dumping ground. Even with regular cleanups of the creek, she said, people are still dumping shopping carts, sofas and electronics into it.

"We still have a long way to go."

pwilson@nugget.ca

http://www.nugget.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3115637 Best Blogger Tips
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Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Newfoundland and Labrador dawdles along through ‘due diligence’

May 9, 2011

The St. John’s Telegram 

Other provinces move ahead

Newfoundland and Labrador dawdles along through ‘due diligence’

Easter has come and gone, and spring is coming, and with it the spray season on our lawns and gardens and the “Keep off the Grass! Poison !” signs will be out.

I would like to thank the Ontario minister of the environment, John Wilkinson, for his recent good news.

Minister Wilkinson said recently that pesticide levels in the 10 urban streams that are monitored by Ontario’s Department of Environment continue to drop.

Minister Wilkinson said on Wednesday past, “that since 250 products were removed from store shelves in 2009, the concentration of the most common pesticides has dropped, including 2.4D, one of the most common pesticides used in urban areas.”

Big drop

In fact, the Ontario environment studies show that all four of the most commonly used pesticides show a very large drop in concentration in urban streams — from 78 per cent to 97 per cent reduction.

The CBC reported that “Some additional products will no longer be readily accessible on store shelves.”

Minister Wilkinson said, “There has been some opposition to the ban on 2.4-D but the Ontario government is standing by its decision,” saying that “the people’s health is at risk.”

So far six Canadian provinces — Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and Alberta have restricted the use of “cosmetic” pesticides, and the current premier of British Columbia has made it clear that legislation in her province is a priority.

What a shame that it is taking so long for our Newfoundland government to do the same thing and bring legislation to our province.

Old news for ministers

The ministers of health and the environment have been aware of the scientific and health studies for a long time.

Ross Wiseman, our minister of environment, having recently met with concerned citizens, is doing “due diligence,” and it appears that no decision is likely in the immediate future.

But he had all the necessary information two years ago when he was minister of health, so a decision on legislating pesticides should not be allowed to yet again be postponed indefinitely.

The scientific literature is encyclopedic in volume and overwhelmingly documents the links to human health, especially to children.

Never mind the cats and dogs and the rest of the environment that are silenced by pesticides.

Wouldn’t it be a lovely spring present from our government to our citizens, to be told that legislation is coming very soon, just before the spray season?

Giving something to celebrate

Easter celebrates the return of life after the death of winter.

Come on, Ministers Wiseman and Jerome Kennedy, let’s all celebrate life, not death. 

Dr. Ian Simpson 
Corner Brook

http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion-1771
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Group Looking to Ban Cosmetic Pesticides

May 10, 2011

vocm.com

An environmental group is urging the government to ban cosmetic pesticides. The Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides-Newfoundland and Labrador has been meeting with environmental and health officials for months now. The group's agenda is to have a law passed that would ban the use of cosmetic pesticides in the province.

The coalition presented a petition to Premier Kathy Dunderdale on April 18th and are calling on the premier to pass legislation before another spraying season begins.

The cosmetic use of pesticides is banned in Ontario, Québec, British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The coalition says that a ban on the use of cosmetic pesticides is good for both our health and the lawn and garden industry, which saw an increase in sales after the bans in Toronto and Halifax.

http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?mn=2&id=14284&latest=1 Best Blogger Tips
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Saturday, May 7, 2011

Time for action - The St. John’s Telegram

May 7, 2011

The St. John’s Telegram 

Time for action

I am writing as a concerned grandparent about how little this provincial Progressive Conservative government cares about the health of our children.

They have continued to ignore pleas to ban the use of cosmetic pesticides sprayed on lawns.

What’s the concern? A growing number of studies have linked the use of pesticides to a variety of health concerns, especially in children. A literature review (an account of what has been published on a topic by accredited scholars and researchers) completed by the Ontario College of Family Physicians in 2004 stated that “several studies found associations between pesticide exposure and solid tumours in children,” in addition to an “association with childhood non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.” As further warning, it stated that “several studies found elevated childhood leukemia rates with pesticide exposure.”

Let’s not forget 2,4,D, which is the common herbicide of choice as it “was associated with a two-fold increase in leukemia incidence.” It also included evidence of neurotoxic and genotoxic effects. Is this fear mongering? No.

Five other provinces (Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, P.E.I. and New Brunswick) have already banned the use of cosmetic pesticide based on this information.

A common argument in our province is that because Health Canada says it’s all right, it’s all right.

Anyone who knows how government agencies work will realize that as agency of the Canadian government, Health Canada, is beholden to the North American Free Trade Agreement. As a result, chemical and pesticide companies can sell what they want here. Health Canada completes industry-driven studies (Why would industry say anything bad about its own products?) and takes into consideration no epidemiological evidence (patterns of illness in populations, a cornerstone of public health).

All of the provinces with legislative bans were aware of Health Canada’s policies on cosmetic pesticides but decided that the evidence for potential harm from these substances is strong and listened to their health-care advisers and the public. How can our province continue to be the only province east of Manitoba without a ban to protect its citizens and the environment?

I talk to many other parents and grandparents of small children that are frustrated with the issue and the insensitivity of our current Newfoundland and Labrador government.

So, in the next election, I, (and I suspect many other parents and grandparents) will not be wasting a vote on a government that doesn’t do more to protect the health of our children.

Phil Riggs writes from Glovertown.

http://www.thetelegram.com/Opinion/Letters-to-the-editor-13424 Best Blogger Tips
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Friday, May 6, 2011

Province of BC to Ban pesticides...Still nothing for NL

May 4, 2011

Ban on cosmetic use of pesticides coming: Premier

By Andrew MacLeod

A day before the B.C. New Democratic Party planned to put forward a bill to ban the cosmetic use of pesticides, Premier Christy Clark said she supports just such a ban.

"I've supported this for years now," she said in a scrum with reporters at the legislature. "We are going to do it."

Clark said she wants to engage with the NDP and the public, especially in rural B.C., to design legislation.

"The NDP are concerned about it, I'm concerned about it," she said. "I think as a new way of governing one of the things we can do is engage everyone who's interested in it, set aside all these partisan divides that pull us apart and find something that we can come together on, and I think this is that issue."

This morning the NDP announced it plans to re-introduce "legislation to ban toxic pesticides from everyday use" since the "BC Liberal government has failed to take any action to protect children from these cancer-causing substances."

"More than 70 per cent of British Columbians support the phase-out of cosmetic pesticides," the release quoted NDP leader Adrian Dix saying. "It's clear that this is another case where New Democrat values are mainstream values."

Clark said she would look at the NDP legislation and it might be a good way to start the process. She would like a bi-partisan committee to consider the issue and how to proceed, she said.

Andrew MacLeod is The Tyee’s Legislative Bureau Chief in Victoria. Reach him here.

http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/BC-Politics/2011/05/04/PesticidePromise/


MORE:


May 3, 2011

NEW DEMOCRATS TO RE-INTRODUCE LEGISLATION BANNING COSMETIC PESTICIDES

Law needed to keep cancerous chemicals away from children, says BC NDP critic

VICTORIA - More than a year after New Democrats introduced legislation to ban toxic pesticides from everyday use, the B.C. Liberal government has failed to take any action to protect children from these cancer-causing substances says New Democrat Leader Adrian Dix.

"Last Earth Day we introduced legislation to ban the frivolous use of cosmetic pesticides but the B.C. Liberals refused to support it," said Dix. "More than 70 per cent of British Columbians support the phase-out of cosmetic pesticides. It's clear that this is another case where New Democrat values are mainstream values."

According to the Canadian Cancer Society there is a significant body of evidence suggesting that exposure to cosmetic pesticides increases the risk of developing cancers like leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, brain cancer, and lung cancer in both adults and children.

"More than 30 B.C. communities have passed by-laws restricting the use of cosmetic pesticides but municipalities don't have the legal power to take these water-polluting, cancer-causing products off of store shelves," said New Democrat Environment Critic Rob Fleming. "Christy Clark needs to tell British Columbians whether or not she intends to take immediate action to protect families from these cancer-causing chemicals."

Fleming noted that more than half of Canadian provinces have implemented some form of cosmetic pesticide ban, with Ontario, Quebec, and Nova Scotia having strong legislation which protects children and the environment.

"New Democrats have introduced legislation to ban cosmetic pesticides twice, and both times the B.C. Liberals let it fall off the order paper," concludes Dix. "The B.C. Liberal government's failure to take action on this issue shows how out-of-step they are with the environmental values of British Columbians.


For more information, contact Michael Roy at 778-928-7132.

http://www.bcndp.ca/newsroom/new-democrats-re-introduce-legislation-banning-cosmetic-pesticides Best Blogger Tips
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Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Pesticides & Politics (Newfoundland)

As you might know, members of CAP-NL met with Minister of Environment Ross Wiseman nearly one month ago to ask him if he would bring in new legislation to ban cosmetic pesticides. Documentation outlining the cancer health effect of pesticides, as well as Ontario’s full legislation were submitted to his office in advance.

After nearly a decade of dedicated advocacy and numerous meetings with health and environment ministers, including when Wiseman was Minister of Health, we finally appear to be in a position to follow Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, PEI, and New Brunswick with this important legislation.

They were told he would make a recommendation to Cabinet in a matter of weeks, after he gave the issue “due diligence”. Unfortunately, there has not been any movement of the issue since and this is troubling. What really happens to citizen proposals? Not to mention the 1,454 people who took the time to sign the petition, presented to the House of Assembly on April 18th.

If you feel strongly about banning cosmetic pesticides before the Summer spray season starts, please write to Russell Wangersky at the Telegram and let him know. Let people know that if they feel the same way they should vote in the Fall election for whichever candidate promises to ban non-essential pesticides and adopt legislation like that of Ontario.

The more letters published the better, as cabinet ministers and MHAs will be reading them.

You can write to letters@thetelegram.com

Also,for more information about the health and environmental effects of pesticides please have a look at our website, facebook group, twitter and youtube channel where you can see what happened at our public forum of you missed it.

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St. John's Daily Spray Advisory

My Past Articles

More enforcement needed for pesticide spray regulations
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 413 words
Karen Griffin - Judie Squires says someone needs to patrol the companies that spray residential areas for pesticides because she's observed nine violations of the Environmental Protection Act in her Paradise neighborhood alone


Spray woes: Province falling down on monitoring pesticides
The Telegram (St. John's) - Final - 10-01-2002 - 253 words
Judie Squires - environment to become poisoned? A temporary ban on all residential pesticides has to be put into place, to protect us, our wildlife and our environment as a whole. Judie Squires Paradise


Government lax on cosmetic pesticide regulation: advocate
The Telegram (St. John's) - 08-28-2004 - 613 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic the province will ban cosmetic use


Woman doesn't expect cosmetic pesticide ban any time soon
The Western Star (Corner Brook) - 08-30-2004 - 712 words
Stokes Sullivan, Deana - Despite increased awareness about adverse health effects from pesticides, Judie Squires, a member of the Pesticide Working Group of Newfoundland and Labrador, isn't optimistic that the province will ban the


Province lagging behind in pesticide control
The Telegram (St. John's) - 09-04-2005 - 496 words
Squires, Judie - it to do is to prohibit the cosmetic use of synthetic pesticides altogether in order to protect our citizens and the environment. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


The two sides to pesticide use
The Telegram (St. John's) - 07-16-2006 - 781 words
Judie Squires - health of your families. When Canada's most respected health authorities tell us pesticides threaten our health, we should all be listening. Judie Squires writes from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's


Inquiry implicates BTk
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 353 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - of trees. The live spores can be inhaled by humans and animals exposed to BT. Judie Squires, secretary of the Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, says despite claims that


Delayed pesticide laws 'disappointing'
The Telegram (St. John's) - 06-24-2006 - 833 words
DEANA STOKES SULLIVAN - at the end of this year. These products will only be sold to certified dealers. Judie Squires, secretary of the newly formed Northeast Avalon Group of the Sierra Club, isn't


Above Articles available through Trancontinental Newsnet

Time for provincial lawn pesticide regulation
The Telegram (St. John's) - 03-14-2009 - 419 words
pesticides. Please join me in lobbying our province for a pesticide ban Judie Squires Portugal Cove...

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